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Vitamin

Fighting Your Vitamin D-Mons with BetterYou

Fight Your Vitamin D-Mons

With winter well on the way, the coughs, headaches and constant tiredness you take for granted may be a symptom of something more serious than just sunlight withdrawal.

So BetterYou, the vitamin oral spray experts, are on hand to explain the importance of vitamin D.

Why is vitamin D so important?

Vitamin D is vital for the development of healthy bones, boosting immunity and helping to fight off colds and flu. Having adequate levels of vitamin D has also been linked to helping prevent cardiovascular diseases, IBS and other auto-immune diseases.

How do I get vitamin D?

We make vitamin D from sunlight, but sadly even during the summer months we miss out on the vital vitamin as we layer on the SPF or head for the shade. So, along with our increasingly indoor lifestyles, by the time it gets to winter we have no chance of maintaining our levels from the sun alone.

Another way of getting vitamin D is through our diet, but unless you plan on eating at least seven eggs or twelve packets of cheese everyday, it is extremely difficult to get the recommended daily allowance, even with a healthy diet.

The easiest way to get the right amount of vitamin D is therefore to use a supplement.

Are you at risk?

The Government now recommends that everyone should take a vitamin D supplement throughout the autumn and winter months, with ‘at risk’ groups being advised to supplement all year round, which include:

  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women
  • Infants and children
  • People over the age of 65
  • People with darker skin
  • Those who have low or no sun exposure

What are the signs?

It’s not surprising that around one in five adults and around one in six children (that’s more than 10 million of us!) have low vitamin D levels. So how do you know if you are lacking in the sunshine vitamin?

Tiredness & fatigue, bone & teeth problems, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), coughs & colds, and low mood are all symptoms of vitamin D deficiency that are often overlooked.

If you suffer from any of these on a regular basis it could mean you are lacking in vitamin D and now is the time to start fighting off those D-mons!

Sunshine in a spray

Many of us don’t like taking pills – we can find them difficult to swallow and are restricted to when we can take them.

But now, supplementing the sunshine vitamin has never been so simple. BetterYou has created a range of vitamin D oral sprays suitable for the whole family which deliver the nutrient directly into the bloodstream, via the soft tissue of our inner cheeks, which trials have shown is 2.5 times more effective than taking vitamin capsules.

Taking a spray rather than tablets or capsules also means that the vitamin is not lost through the processes of the digestive system, and is easy to use on the go with no need for food or water.

Take a look at how an oral spray can help boost your levels.

Fight your vitamin D-mons with the award-winning DLux Vitamin D Oral Spray range by BetterYou and get 20% with bodykind this Vitamin D Awareness Week.

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Vitamin D May Prevent Uterine Fibroids

Women with adequate Vitamin D levels are 32% less likely to develop uterine fibroids, according to a new study published in Epidemiology journal this month (1).

Uterine fibroids are noncancerous growths attached to the uterus, and they normally affect women of childbearing age. Many women with fibroids experience no symptoms at all. In others, fibroids can cause symptoms such as heavy periods, pelvic pain, frequent urination, difficulty emptying the bladder and backache. As a result of these debilitating symptoms, fibroids are one the most common reasons for women to undergo hysterectomy.

Fibroids occur in around 20% of women, but those of African descent have been shown to have a higher incidence of fibroid formation (50-80%). They are a significant concern for women because of the difficult symptoms linked to their growth. In addition, fibroids are a particular concern to women of childbearing age as they can have a negative effect on fertility. They can block the fallopian tubes, affect blood flow to the uterine cavity, change the shape of the uterus and prevent sperm from travelling through the cervix.

In the recent study, led by Donna Baird of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), researchers measured levels of Vitamin D

The Sun
Exposure to the sun for more than one hour can decrease risk of fibroids

in 1,036 women between the ages of 35-49. Circulating levels of Vitamin D, also known as 25-hydroxy D, were measured using blood samples. Women with more than 20 nanograms per millilitre were classed as having sufficient levels of the vitamin, although many specialists believe that the minimum level for sufficiency should be higher still.

Study participants also completed a questionnaire on sun exposure. Those who spent more than one hour outside per day had a decreased risk of fibroids, with an estimated reduction of 40 percent. It is interesting to note that fibroids are more common in black women, and that black women also tend to have lower levels of Vitamin D as skin pigmentation reduces the formation of Vitamin D in the skin (2).

Scientists are often quick to point out that “correlation does not imply causation”, meaning that a correlation between two factors does not mean that one causes the other. However in this case the researchers provide evidence of a causal relationship. The researchers noted that treatment of cultures of human uterine fibroid tissue with a form of Vitamin D resulted in decreased cell proliferation accompanied by inhibition of molecular pathways for fibrosis. In other words, Vitamin D was found to play active role in slowing the growth of fibroid tissue.

The study authors conclude that the link between Vitamin D and uterine fibroids warrants further investigation, and it is hoped that these findings will encourage further research in this area. In the meantime, it would be wise for those affected by fibroids to take measures to ensure their Vitamin D levels are sufficient.

References

1. Baird D et al (2013) Vitamin D and the Risk of Uterine Fibroids. Epidemiology. May 2013. 24:3, 447-453.

2. Harris S (2006) Vitamin D and African Americans. Am Soc Nutr. April 2006. 136:4, 1126-1129.

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UK Falls Short on Vitamin Intake

It is 100 years since the discovery of vitamins by Polish scientist Casimir Funk. A century later, are we managing to meet our recommended intake of these vital nutrients? A study published last month in the British Journal of Nutrition suggests that we are not (1).

The study, a review of national dietary surveys, has highlighted shortfalls in the Western diet, with adults in the UK likely to be deficient in critical nutrients such as Vitamins D and E.

The researchers reviewed the diets of adults in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and the USA, and compared them with national recommendations. Data was taken from the more recent national dietary intake surveys from each country as a basis for the analysis.

Of the countries studies, the Netherlands appeared healthiest, with fewer significant vitamin shortfalls compared with the rest of Europe and the US. Data from the UK and the USA showed similar patterns and levels of deficiencies, perhaps reflecting similar dietary habits and lifestyles.

Data from the UK included dietary information for both men and women between the ages of 19 and 49 years old. The results showed that more than 75% of men and women in the UK are deficient in Vitamins D and E, Furthermore, between 50-75% of UK adults are deficient in Vitamin A. Up to 50% of UK women were also found to fall short of the recommended dietary intake of certain B Vitamins such as folic acid and riboflavin.

Fruit Bowl
Fruit can help to maintain your vitamin levels.

The researchers concede that “a gap exists between vitamin intakes and requirements for a significant proportion of the population, even though diverse foods are available.” Increases in the consumption of fast food with low nutritional value probably accounts for this ‘gap’. A diet based on nutrient-dense, organic, whole foods is the best way to meet your nutritional requirements. A healthy diet should also be free from added sugar, refined grains and alcohol which ‘rob’ the body of nutrients.

Dr Manfred Eggersdorfer, DSM Senior Vice-President for Nutrition and Science Advocacy, and one of the study’s authors, concludes that action is needed to ensure that we are getting the vitamins we need for optimal health.  “This research highlights that 100 years after the discovery [of vitamins], there are still major gaps that urgently need closing – to improve people’s long term health and to drive down healthcare costs.”

Failing to meet the recommended levels of vitamins can leave individuals vulnerable to a host of chronic, diet-related diseases. In the UK in particular,  the recent study shows that many are failing to obtain adequate levels of Vitamins A, C and E in our diets. As these vitamins are major antioxidant nutrients, then, this could mean that a large number of the UK population are vulnerable to oxidative damage which is linked to the progression of a huge range of conditions from accelerated ageing and inflammation to cataracts, hypertension and diabetes.

Changing lifestyles mean that, even with the best of intentions, we do not always have the time or opportunity to ensure that we are getting all the nutrients we need from our diet. Processed convenience foods are all too readily available. Furthermore, unavoidable factors such as stress and pollution increase our nutrient needs. Small dietary changes can help to redress the balance. Regular consumption of oily fish, eggs and brightly coloured vegetables will help deliver a balanced of Vitamin A and its precursor beta-carotene, while regular snacks of fresh fruit and raw nuts and seeds will provide Vitamins C and E. For those in need of additional support, a good quality multi-vitamin or antioxidant supplement will help close the gap between vitamin intakes and recommendations.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

References

1. Troesch et al (2012) Dietary surveys indicate vitamin intakes below recommendations are common in representative Western countries. Brit J Nutr 108:4, pp. 692-698.

2. Image courtesy of  lynnc

 

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