Tag Archives: ubiquinol

Top Nutrients for Heart Health

Collectively, conditions affecting the heart are the UK’s biggest killer. Almost 2.3 million people live with coronary heart disease (CHD), leading to annual NHS healthcare costs of almost £2 billion. Key risk factors for heart disease affect large proportions of the adult population – one third of adults have high blood pressure while 60% have sub-optimal blood cholesterol levels. Despite these alarming figures, many risk factors are within our control and making simple changes to our diet and lifestyle can have a dramatic impact on our health. As we mark National Heart month we turn our attention to key nutrients and nutrition supplements that play a strong role in maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle.

ALA Omega-3

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is a type of omega-3 essential fatty acid (or ‘good’ polyunsaturated fat) that has been shown over years of research to help maintain normal cholesterol levels. Although cholesterol is a vital resource in the body, helping to carry out a number of important functions such as repairing blood vessels, creating hormones, production of vitamin D, and helping to transport vitamins A, D, E & K, it can become a risk when levels of LDL ‘bad’ cholesterol become too high. This can trigger a build-up of plaque in the arteries, which can eventually

making simple changes to our diet and lifestyle can have a dramatic impact on our health
Making simple changes to our diet and lifestyle can have a dramatic impact on our health

lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Dual cholesterol protection

Despite popular belief, only 20% of the cholesterol in our body comes from our diet whereas the majority, the remaining 80%, is produced by our own cells, mainly in the liver. ALA directly reduces production of cholesterol in the liver at its source, which is a highly effective way of normalising cholesterol levels.

ALA is also well known for reducing inflammation in the body, which helps to slow down plaque build-up in the arteries. Taking ALA daily is a great way to favourably balance the ratio of ‘good’ to ‘bad’ fats consumed in the diet.

Ubiquinol CoQ10

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a naturally occurring enzyme with a multitude of roles in the cardiovascular system. CoQ10 acts within our cells in the mitochondria, the body’s energy ‘powerhouse’. Maintaining healthy CoQ10 levels fuels the mitochondria and supports the high energy requirements of our organs, particularly the heart. In addition to energy production, CoQ10 plays a vital role in oxygen utilisation to further support the functioning of heart muscle cells and maintain good circulatory health. CoQ10 also helps to lower blood pressure and is recognised as an effective cholesterol lowering ‘agent’.

Research studies show that people with cardiovascular problems often have low levels of CoQ10. Risk of deficiency is even higher with patients taking statins to lower cholesterol, since not only are they likely to have low levels of CoQ10 but statins also block natural ubiquinol synthesis in the body.

Ubiquinol versus Ubiquinone

There are two types of CoQ10 used in supplements: ubiquinone and ubiquinol. Ubiquinol is ‘body-ready’, which means the body doesn’t have to convert it into a usable form – a therapeutic advantage over ubiquinone. As an antioxidant, ubiquinol also offers protection against arterial plaque, thereby reducing heart attack risk and safeguarding heart muscle cells from free radical damage. Uniquely, ubiquinol also regenerates other beneficial antioxidants such as vitamins C and E.

Ubiquinone versus ubiquinol is just half the battle with CoQ10; addressing bioavailability is a further challenge, since therapeutic outcomes are achieved by raising blood plasma levels. Most ubiquinol supplements are oil-based, which means that large ubiquinol particles struggle to pass through the gut’s water layer barrier and are poorly absorbed. A special patented delivery system called VESIsorb®, utilised by CoQ10 manufacturer Igennus, optimises absorption by converting ubiquinol into water-soluble particles, ‘pre-digesting’ it so ubiquinol is effectively fast-tracked through the digestive system. VESIsorb delivers ubiquinol into the blood stream 2 times faster than standard oil-based forms, increasing tissue distribution throughout the body to achieve significantly higher blood concentrations that remain at therapeutic levels for up to 6 times longer.

Live cultures

Three specific live cultures L. plantarum CECT 7527, 7528 and 7529, help break down bile salts, which are made from cholesterol, therefore allowing its removal from the body. These friendly bacteria also metabolise dietary cholesterol in the gut, therefore reducing its absorption into the bloodstream. The AB-LIFE strains also produce a beneficial short-chain fatty acid known as propionic acid, which signals the liver to produce less cholesterol and also has an anti-inflammatory effect.

Top heart health supplements

A new and unique formula from OptiBac Probiotics is the first of its kind formulated for heart health. For your cholesterol is a pioneering, well researched multi-targeted natural supplement that combines unique live cultures with omega-3 ALA from cold-pressed virgin flaxseed oil – offering a multitude of benefits for managing healthy cholesterol levels.

Since not all live cultures are the same, OptiBac Probiotics focuses on specific strains of natural bacteria that have been clinically tested and proven to survive stomach acidity, bile salts and digestive enzymes in order to find the best live cultures for the job.

VESIsorb® Ubiquinol-QH from Igennus provides 100 mg of fast-acting body-ready ubiquinol CoQ10 for optimal therapeutic benefits. Taken daily, this advanced supplement offers comprehensive cardiovascular support, providing potent antioxidant activity and maximal energy production.

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Clarifying CoQ10 supplements

CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10) is a naturally occurring compound, synthesised endogenously and found in small levels in an average diet. Found predominantly in the mitochondria of the cells, this important enzyme plays a key role in energy production and is vital for ensuring normal everyday functioning. In addition to its role in energy production, CoQ10 is a potent antioxidant and is also able to regenerate other antioxidants including vitamin E, vitamin C and lipoic acid. Its ability to quench free radicals is, in fact, key to maintaining the structural integrity and stability of mitochondrial and cell membranes. [1] CoQ10 levels generally peak around the age of 20-30 and decline with increasing age. Significantly decreased levels of CoQ10 are found in a wide variety of diseases, especially those associated with oxidative stress [2] as wells in individuals using statins for cholesterol management. Also known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins treat elevated blood cholesterol levels by blocking cholesterol biosynthesis. In doing so, however, they also block CoQ10 biosynthesis, which may lead to symptoms of fatigue and muscle pain (known as statin-induced myopathy). [3]

Ubiquinone and ubiquinol

Ubiquinol
CoQ10 exists in two forms, as ubiquinone (the oxidised CoQ10, spent form) and ubiquinol (the reduced and activated, antioxidant form).

CoQ10 exists in two forms, as ubiquinone (the oxidised CoQ10, spent form) and ubiquinol (the reduced and activated, antioxidant form). In order for CoQ10 to play a role in energy production and exhibit an antioxidant effect, the body must metabolise it to its antioxidant form ubiquinol, a process inhibited with increasing age, nutrient deficiency and some health conditions. Taking CoQ10 as ubiquinone is therefore not as effective as taking CoQ10 as ubiquinol (Kaneka QH™) the ‘body-ready’ form which has only been available for use in supplements since 2006. Ubiquinol has numerous advantages over ubiquinone and comparing the two forms in therapeutic outcomes far surpasses its oxidised precursor.

Bioavailability

When addressing the issue of therapeutics, at first glance the dose of ubiquinol may seem particularly relevant; however, it is the blood plasma level achieved by supplementation that is the significant factor in determining the effectiveness of a treatment. [4] As a lipid-soluble nutrient, ubiquinol absorption and bioavailability is generally poor, with as much as 60% eliminated in the faeces. [5] Whilst the structure of ubiquinol renders it more water-soluble than ubiquinone, most common formulations of ubiquinol (found in powder form or dispersed in oil suspensions) are of relatively low bioavailability. [6] As clinical outcomes are dependent on increasing the bioavailability, solubilising ubiquinol is the only method to guarantee that therapeutically viable blood plasma levels are achieved.

VESIsorb® for unprecedented bioavailability

Ubiquinol that utilises the VESIsorb® technology offers unprecedented bioavailability to deliver plasma levels superior to all other forms of CoQ10. [7] When in contact with the aqueous contents of the stomach, this novel delivery system naturally self-assembles into colloidal droplets (micro-emulsion), engulfing the ubiquinol, which is then able to completely dissolve in water. By doing so, ubiquinol is effectively fast-tracked from the gut lumen, through the unstirred water layer barrier that lines the gut wall, directly into the enterocyte cell for immediate transfer to the circulatory system.

Igennus VESIsorb® Ubiquinol-QH

Igennus VESIsorb® Ubiquinol-QH ensures significantly higher plasma concentrations that reach therapeutic levels up to 2 times faster and are sustained for up to 6 times longer than any other delivery system or form of CoQ10. Unlike other delivery forms of CoQ10, this highly advanced delivery system achieves and maintains clinically effective plasma concentrations of CoQ10, supporting cardiovascular function, energy production, reduce the risk of neurodegenerative disease and provide potent antioxidant activity with just one 100 mg capsule daily.

References

1. Rauchova H, Drahota Z, Lenaz G: Function of coenzyme Q in the cell: some biochemical and physiological properties. Physiological research / Academia Scientiarum Bohemoslovaca 1995, 44:209-216.

2. Potgieter M, Pretorius E, Pepper MS: Primary and secondary coenzyme Q10 deficiency: the role of therapeutic supplementation. Nutrition reviews 2013, 71:180-188.

3. Watts GF, Castelluccio C, Rice-Evans C, Taub NA, Baum H, Quinn PJ: Plasma coenzyme Q (ubiquinone) concentrations in patients treated with simvastatin. Journal of clinical pathology 1993, 46:1055-1057.

4. Shults CW, Oakes D, Kieburtz K, Beal MF, Haas R, Plumb S, Juncos JL, Nutt J, Shoulson I, Carter J, et al: Effects of coenzyme Q10 in early Parkinson disease: evidence of slowing of the functional decline. Archives of neurology 2002, 59:1541-1550.

5. Wyman M, Leonard M, Morledge T: Coenzyme Q10: a therapy for hypertension and statin-induced myalgia? Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine 2010, 77:435-442.

6. Bhagavan HN, Chopra RK: Coenzyme Q10: absorption, tissue uptake, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Free radical research 2006, 40:445-453.

7. Liu ZX, Artmann C: Relative bioavailability comparison of different coenzyme Q10 formulations with a novel delivery system. Alternative therapies in health and medicine 2009, 15:42-46.

 

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