Tag Archives: travelling

Probiotics, our friends inside

The human intestinal tract is home to trillions of “friendly” bacteria that are crucial in maintaining good health. These bacteria are instrumental in protecting against tummy problems, supporting digestion and absorption of nutrients. The balance of this gut micro flora is also intrinsically linked with immunity, ensuring a positive balance of beneficial gut bacteria will give your immune system a fighting chance of beating off the majority of opportunistic pathogens.

Antacids, antibiotics and low fibre refined diets all disrupt this delicate balance. This is possibly why an estimated 1 in 5 adults in the UK suffer from gastrointestinal complaints. Rebalancing the gut micro flora through the diet or by taking a “probiotic” supplement containing strains of friendly bacteria has been shown to help maintain the health of the intestinal tract and aid digestion, reduced bloating and the establishment of a regular bowel habits.

A change of food may upset a sensitive tummy

Our immune system is used to dealing with bacterial or viral challenges on a regular basis, but when we travel we can encounter different or possibly more pathogenic strains that then cause us to become ill. A change of food may also upset a sensitive tummy, as well as traveller’s diarrhoea people may also suffer from bloating or discomfort. You can reduce your chances of falling ill by giving your immune system and gut flora extra support by taking a probiotic supplement before jetting off to exotic destinations. Closer to home evidence continues to grow that probiotic supplements are a key element in the management of IBS, a combination of L.plantarum and L.acidophilus has been found to be especially effective.

Choosing a probiotic supplement

The effectiveness of probiotics is linked to their ability to survive the transit from stomach to small intestine; to do so they must be able to resist both acidic and alkaline conditions.

To confer health benefits probiotic supplements must contain live bacteria capable of adhering to the intestinal lining and colonise in the colon. Always choose products by trusted and established manufacturers.

Lyophilised (freeze dried) bacteria are stable at room temperature so do not need refrigeration.

Look for a delayed release product, delaying the release of the bacteria until they reach the small intestine protects them against the acidic environment of the stomach and delivering them directly where they are needed.

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5 Tips for Healthy Travel

‘Buy an adaptor, find my swimsuit, pick up the dry cleaning, pack the phone chargers!’. When you’re rushing around last minute preparing for a holiday, your health is often the last thing on your mind. However when you put your body in an unfamiliar environment, often with little sleep along the way, it’s important to look after your health. What’s more, your holiday should be a time to explore, relax, and let go. You certainly don’t want an upset stomach or heavy case of jetlag ruining your fun time so we’ve prepared 5 simple steps to enjoy your holiday, the healthy way.

1. Beat the jet lag

The real pros will try to adjust their sleep schedules 2–3 days before leaving on holiday. If you know that you’re going to be sleeping and waking up later once you reach a different time zone, try to work your way into that time zone before you even leave home. Even if all you can manage is half an hour or an hour of difference, it should help to make life easier (and your holiday more relaxing!) when you’re trying to adjust to a new time schedule abroad.

2. Pack healthy snacks

Spend time preparing healthy snacks for you and your family before you leave for the airport. It will be much better for your body, and likely better for your bank balance, than picking up sugary or carb-loaded snacks at the airport. Cut up some apples, carrots, or try things like sugar snap peas – they’re good raw too and with an extra crunch which should go down well with the kids.

 3. Wear sun cream

Even if there is cloud cover, the sun can burn. Choose a sun cream with at least SPF 15, or at least SPF 30 if you’re off to a hot and sunny destination. Do not forget to top up on your cream throughout the day , this is where a lot of people slip up – it’s not enough to put cream on once in the morning then forget about it! Make sure you have a good sized day bag to carry all your essentials including your sun cream, snacks and water.

4. Water, water, everywhere!

Optibac can help with bowel calm when travelling abroad
OptiBac Probiotics for travelling abroad helps support a traveller’s digestive health

Do not forget to hydrate. Carry a bottle of water around with you. A lot of us forget to hydrate properly when we’re not in our usual place (e.g. at our desk at work) and hydration is all the more important when you’re enjoying a warm, sunny holiday. Water will flush the pathogens out of your body, and help to prevent any stomach upsets.

5. Look after your gut health

When visiting a new country, the body, and in particular your digestive system, have a tough time adjusting to a new environment and to new foods. Up to 50% of travellers are said to experience traveller’s diarrhoea because the ingestion of foreign microbes can upset the stomach (not much fun when you’re supposed to be enjoying yourself!).

Look after your digestive health whilst abroad by taking a probiotic especially made for travel. OptiBac Probiotics ‘For travelling abroad’ supports your body’s natural defence against bad bacteria whilst travelling. Get 60 capsules for £19.99 (usually £30.57) – perfect for those travelling as a family, or going away for a significant length of time.

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Travelling abroad? Pack a Probiotic

Did you know?

Each year, up to 50% of travellers are thought to experience the dreaded ‘traveller’s diarrhoea’ (1.), and with more people going abroad year on year, that’s an awful lot of upset stomachs.

There’s nothing worse: You’ve booked your holiday, looked forward to it for months, packed all of the right clothes, sun creams, insect repellents and so on. You arrive at your destination tired, but thrilled to be there… You settle in to the hotel, enjoy a couple of fabulous local dishes, and hey presto – you’ve been hit with a tummy bug. What now? You have to spend precious holiday time sitting on the loo!

Why?

The body’s balance of friendly bacteria is delicate, and can easily be disrupted. Travelling can naturally put strains on the immune system, and when you travel to new environments and eat foreign foods, unfamiliar microbes can irritate the gut wall lining – causing diarrhoea.

OptiBac Probiotics - For Travelling Abroad
A probiotic supplement such as OptiBac Probiotics - For Travelling Abroad - taken during your holiday could help avoid an upset tummy!

Gastroenterologist Dr Georges Mouton recommends taking a probiotic supplement such as ‘For travelling abroad’ by OptiBac Probiotics – especially made to support your gut health during travels. This travel probiotic has been shown to reduce the likelihood of contracting travellers’ diarrhoea to just five per cent (2.). For travelling abroad contains four different probiotics, chosen for their ability to support the immune system, and to flush out pathogenic bacteria before it can cause an upset tummy. Unlike many popular probiotic yoghurt drinks, this vegetarian supplement contains no added sugars or flavourings, and does not require refrigeration. So you can rest assured it wont lose any of it’s potency whilst in transit to your holiday destination.

It is advised to start taking a travel probiotic 3 – 5 days before you go away, to support your digestive health in advance, and then every day during your holiday.

Other precautions?

Other things you can do to minimise your risk of contracting traveller’s diarrhoea include regularly washing your hands and especially before eating and drinking, avoiding raw foods or salads and sticking to bottled water.

So next time you go away, don’t get caught short and remember to protect your digestive health…

 

Written by OptiBac Probiotics

References

(1.)  http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/travelersdiarrhea_g.htm
(2.) McFarland, L. V. (2007) Meta-analysis of probiotics for the prevention of traveller’s diarrhoea. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. Vol. 5, Issue 2, pp. 97 – 105

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