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skin

3 top tips for glowing skin and beating the bloat

Making waves on the beach – 3 top tips for glowing skin and beating the bloat

Summer is all about feeling good, looking good and hopefully, enjoying a well-earned break. Most of us know the general advice on how to get in shape for the beach, we just need to find the willpower to do it.

However, sometimes no matter how much effort you put in, many of us still feel far from glowing and confident in our bikinis or beach shorts. So, what last minute tips can you employ that might actually make a difference?

3 top tips for glowing skin

  • There’s truth in the saying that great skin starts from within. Boosting intake of essential fats, particularly the omega-3 fats that are often deficient in our diets, can improve skin lustre and reduce inflammation. Try increasing consumption of oily fish such as mackerel or salmon to three portions a week and add a daily snack of a tablespoon of raw unsalted nuts and seeds. These protein rich foods also increase satiation, helping to curb cravings for sugary snacks. If you are not a fish fan, or if you are vegan or vegetarian, try drizzling Udo’s Choice, a plant based omega blend on salads or in smoothies.
  • Hydration really helps improve the skin but remember to sip water throughout the day rather than all in one go.  If you find water too boring, experiment with infusing a jug of water with seasonal fruits and garden herbs such as watermelon and mint. Cucumber water is also deliciously refreshing.
  • You’re not likely to be heading to the Himalayas on holiday but try to make use of some fine grade Himalayan salt crystals in a DIY body scrub to get the skin glowing. Known for their detoxifying properties, these pretty pink crystals have been around for millions of years and contain an impressive 84 minerals including magnesium, calcium, iron and potassium.

3 top tips for beating the bloat

Bloating can falsely change your shape and size, and can make even confident people feel body shy. Depending on the health of your digestion you may also be prone to gaining weight or suffer with food intolerance’s. A dodgy gut can also be the root cause of lethargy, headaches and skin problems.

  • Increase natural, digestion-friendly fibre such as that found in fruit and vegetables. Not only will it improve transit time, but fibrous food also bind to excess oestrogen in the digestive tract, carrying it out of the body. Good sources include brown rice, carrots, cucumbers and celery. However, contrary to good long term advice, don’t overdo plant proteins like beans, pulses or binge on broccoli in the run up to your travels if they are not already in your diet. All can create excessive gas!
  • If you’ve already joined the gut-health trend then you will be familiar with probiotic rich natural foods such as natural yogurt, kefir or sauerkraut. These foods are an ideal way of increasing beneficial bacteria in the gut that help sort tummy issues at source and even help with natural immunity. If you are new to these foods, introduce small amounts daily.
  • How you eat is important too. Mindful is a word that’s becoming ubiquitous for just about anything related to wellbeing but it is fits perfectly when it comes to eating well. Chew slowly and don’t eat when stressed, simple rules that help ease the bloat. And, when a busy day is coming to an end, soak in a magnesium rich Epsom salts to relax muscle stiffness and help promote a restful beauty sleep.
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Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis – Love Your Bones; Protect Your Future

Osteoporosis: Protect Your Bones – Three Key Nutrients You May Be Missing

October 20th is World Osteoporosis Day. This year, the theme of the campaign is Love Your Bones; Protect Your Future, encouraging all of us to take early action to protect bone health.

From the age of 50, one in every three women and one in five men will suffer a bone fracture as a result of poor bone health. “The progressive bone loss that occurs with osteoporosis may be invisible and painless, but this ‘silent’ disease results in fractures which cause pain, disability, and ultimately loss of independence or premature death,” states Prof. John Kanis, President of the International Osteoporosis Foundation.

Fortunately, taking care to adopt a healthy diet and undertake regular exercise is well-known to help protect bone health in later years. Vitamin and mineral supplements containing key nutrients for bone health – such as calcium, magnesium, vitamins D and K, and boron – can also be a sensible way of providing additional protection.

While many of us are aware of the role of nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D in bone health, it is important to note that healthy bones are dependent on a whole host of nutritional factors. Below are the top three commonly overlooked bone-boosters.

1. Protein

In the past, there has been concern over the link between protein intake and bone loss. It was believed that high protein intake might result in loss of bone mass by causing calcium to be leeched from bones.

However, more recent research has found that, provided calcium intake is sufficient, adults with the highest protein intakes have the lowest rates of bone loss (1). Protein makes up about 50% of bone, and so bone requires a constant intake of protein to maintain its mass.

Ensuring a good intake of foods high in both calcium and protein is essential, especially for older people whose protein intake tends to be lower. For those who drink protein shakes, try adding in some calcium-rich kale, Greek yoghurt or a spoon of tahini or almond butter. Aside from dairy, good sources of both calcium and protein are canned salmon (with bones), tofu, almonds, white beans and sesame seeds. The top choice however, is tinned sardines which are cheap, easily available and also provide another little-known bone builder, omega-3.

2. Omega-3

Osteoporosis has strong links with inflammation, because inflammatory compounds have a direct effect on the cells that form and break down bone.

It is widely understood that omega-3 fats have an anti-inflammatory effect. While larger studies are needed to confirm this benefit, research to date is promising. For example, combining exercise with omega-3 supplements has been shown to improve bone density better than exercise alone (2). In a second study, a test diet with a higher amount of omega-3 fats was found to reduce bone breakdown, when compared with a typical Western diet (3).

Taking care to include sources of omega-3 in the diet is recommended to fight chronic inflammation. Omega-3 fats are abundant in oily fish, and are also present in leafy greens, chia and flaxseed.

3. Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is damage that occurs when free radicals attack our body. This can include damage to bone, by reducing bone formation and increasing bone resorption.

Women with osteoporosis have been found to have lower levels of antioxidant nutrients in their blood than women with healthy bones (4). Fortunately, antioxidants in both whole foods and supplements have been found to protect bone health (5,6).

Including antioxidant-rich foods would therefore appear to be a sensible way to help keep bones healthy. While some might choose an antioxidant supplement, key antioxidants are also easy to include in our daily diet. For example, blueberries and green tea supply flavonoids, tomatoes are a rich source of lycopene and red grapes provide resveratrol.

References
1. Thorpe et al (2008) Effects of meat consumption and vegetarian diet on risk of wrist fracture over 25 years in cohort of peri- and postmenopausal women. Public Health Nutr. 11(6):564-572
2. Tartibian et al (2011) Long-term aerobic exercise and omega-3 supplementation modulate osteoporosis through inflammatory mechanisms in post-menopausal women: a randomized, repeated measures study.” Nutr & Met 8:71
3. Griel et al (2007) An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans. Nutr J.16;6:2.
4. Maggio et al. (2003). Marked decrease in plasma antioxidants in aged osteoporotic women: Results of a cross-sectional study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 88(4), 1523-1527.
5. Peters, B. S., & Martini, L. A. (2010). Nutritional aspects of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Arq Bras Endocrinol Metab, 54(2), 179-185.
6. Rao et al (2007). Lycopene consumption decreases oxidative stress and bone resorption markers in postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int, 18(1), 109-115.

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A protein-rich breakfast may prevent food cravings and overeating

A recent study has found that eating a protein-rich breakfast reduces feelings of hunger throughout the day (1).  Skipping breakfast has been linked with overeating, weight gain and obesity. Those who regularly skip breakfast have 4.5 times the risk of obesity as those who consume breakfast regularly (2).

Protein Rich Breakfast
A recent study has found that eating a protein-rich breakfast reduces feelings of hunger throughout the day. (3)

Researcher Heather Leidy recently conducted a study to determine whether the type of breakfast we eat might also affect hunger and feelings of fullness.  She assessed hunger and satiety by measuring self-perceived appetite sensations. The researchers also used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify activity in specific areas of the brain related to food motivation and reward.

The study was conducted on overweight teenage girls who habitually skipped breakfast. One group of participants was given a regular breakfast of cereal and milk for seven days, while a second group ate a higher protein breakfast. On the seventh day, the participants completed appetite and satiety questionnaires. They were also given a brain scan which recorded the brain’s response to images of food prior to lunch.

Compared to skipping breakfast, both types of morning meal led to increased fullness and reduced appetite before lunchtime. The brain scan confirmed that activity in regions of the brain that control ‘food motivation and reward’, or the desire to eat, was reduced at lunchtime when breakfast had been eaten earlier.  Additionally, the protein-rich breakfast led to even greater changes in appetite, feelings of fullness and desire to eat.

Leidy advises caution in interpreting the results of this preliminary study, as the sample size was small. The initial findings indicate that eating a protein-rich breakfast might help to control appetite and prevent overeating in young people.  “People reach for convenient snack foods to satisfy their hunger between meals, but these foods are almost always high in sugar and fat and add a substantial amount of calories to the diet.” Liedy said. “Incorporating a healthy breakfast containing protein-rich foods can be a simple strategy for people to stay satisfied longer, and therefore, be less prone to snacking,”

Protein-rich breakfasts can be simple and quick to prepare. Try a couple of poached eggs on a slice of wholegrain toast, unsweetened museli with natural yoghurt, or a couple of slices of rye bread spread with peanut butter. Or for those who love their usual breakfast cereal, you can boost the protein content by sprinkling on a protein powder such as Higher Nature’s Hemp Protein.

References

1.  Heather J. Leidy, et al. Harris. Neural Responses to Visual Food Stimuli After a Normal vs. Higher Protein Breakfast in Breakfast-Skipping Teens: A Pilot fMRI Study. Obesity, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/oby.2011.108.

2.  Ma, Y., Bertone, E., Staneck, EJ., et al. Association between Eating Patterns and Obesity in a Free-living US Adult Population. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2003; DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwg117.3.

3.  Image courtesy of  Simon Howden.

Written by Nadia Mason

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