Tag Archives: eczema

Probiotics may prevent childhood eczema

Eczema is a dry, itchy skin condition, and childhood eczema can be distressing for both children and their parents. Unfortunately, childhood eczema is becoming increasingly common.

A new study looking at the effects of a probiotic called Lactobacillus Rhamnosus offers a promising new approach to dealing with this troublesome condition (1).

Research published last month in the journal Clinical and Experimental Allergy found that children who take probiotics in the first two years of life had a decreased incidence of eczema, and were protected against the condition until at least 4 years of age.

The researchers followed 425 infants for 4 years after daily supplementation with the probiotics L. Rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium animalis or placebo.

Probiotics in pregnancy and childhood can prevent eczema
Taking probiotics, specifically Lactobacillus Rhamnosus, during pregnancy and in childhood can prevent childhood eczema (2,3)

The mothers were given a probiotic supplement or a placebo pill at the gestational age of 35 weeks. Each mother continued to take the supplement for 6 months following the birth, while her baby was breastfeeding. After this time, all of the infants were given a probiotic or placebo supplement from birth until the age of 2.

The results showed that the protective effect of the probiotic lasted until the children were at least 4 years of age.

The research team published the initial results of their double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, back in 2008 (2). Here they tested the effects of the probiotic during the first two years of life. They found that the supplement L. Rhamnosus (strain HN001) resulted in a 49% reduction in eczema prevalence – essentially it halved the risk of eczema in the children studied.

The more recent study demonstrates that the benefits of L. Rhamnosus HN001 persisted to age 4 years, despite the fact that probiotic supplementation stopped two years earlier. This suggests that this particular probiotic might work as a protective measure against eczema for high-risk infants.

There is no way of knowing for sure if you baby will have eczema. However, the risk of your baby developing eczema is much greater if someone in your family has already had eczema, asthma and hayfever. If these conditions are present in your family, then probiotic supplementation may offer some degree of protection for your children.

The authors of the study concede that “the precise pathways for effects [of probiotics] on allergic disease remain elusive and require more work”. In light of the distress that this skin condition can cause to both children and parents, I certainly hope that this study paves the way for future research in this area.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

References
1. Wickens, K. et al (2012) A protective effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 against eczema in the first 2 years of life persists to age 4 years. Clinical & Experimental Allergy. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2222.2012.03975

2. Wicken et al (2008) A differential effect of 2 probiotics in the prevention of eczema and atopy: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. J Allergy & Clin Immunol 122:4, pp. 788-794

3. Image courtesy of Rocknroli.

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Healthy skin the light therapy way

The health of our skin is often the first thing people notice when we speak to them.  It can tell the tales of the past whether it be sun damage or pigmentation from enjoying just that little bit too much sunshine, or wrinkles and age spots just because of the inevitable ageing process.  It can also display some of the more confidence-sapping conditions such as rosacea, eczema or acne.  Like it or not, we can often be judged on our appearances and the health of our skin and if it isn’t looking or feeling its best it can make us feel insecure.

Skin Light Therapy
Of late, more people are turning to light therapy to help their skin regain its natural balance.

There are all sorts of lotions, potions and treatments out there to help improve the appearance of our skin, some more natural than others.  Many people don’t fancy botox or collagen injections in search of eternal youth or want to take high strength prescription medicines to dry out their acne vulgaris.  Often these prescriptions have negative side effects sometimes associated with these treatments, such as digestive complaints or further skin inflammation.  Of late, more people are turning to light therapy to help their skin regain its natural balance and help improve the appearance of wrinkles, spider veins, acne and roseacea the natural way.  Light therapy is the exposure to specific wavelengths of light for a specific amount of time in order to treat a particular disorder, problem or concern.

Daylight is a vital ingredient for our existence and since time began humans have responded to their natural environments.  We feel happier in sunny months and our skin is often healthier when the sun is out for longer with more natural daylight available.  Light lamps emitting red and/or blue wavelengths are often used for those with skin concerns such as acne vulgaris, p.acnes, rosacea, spider veins, wrinkles or inflammation.  Blue wavelengths are used for anti-bacterial treatment, while red wavelengths are best for reducing inflammation, pigmentation and fine lines.

Britebox Dermaclear
Models such as the Britebox dermaclear now combine both red & blue wavelengths in order to reduce both bacteria and inflammation.

Blue wavelengths are primarily used for the treatment of acne and to reduce bacteria, however many models such as the Britebox dermaclear now combine both red & blue wavelengths in order to reduce both bacteria and inflammation and for better, faster results.  Infrared and red wavelengths are primarily used for skin pigmentation, wrinkles and fine lines, roseacea, spider veins and age spots.

Treatment times vary between models and can range from 3 minutes to 30 minutes per day with results being seen from anything between 24 hours and 8 weeks – depending on severity of the skin concern.

View our Skin Health Light Therapy Comparison chart here

We have many other blog posts on supporting the health of the skin written by Ani Richardson RNutri. For further reading, see her posts here.

Written by Katie Guest

References

*Extracts taken from bodykind’s Light Therapy Knowledge Base

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