Tag Archives: dietary magnesium

Magnesium supplementation boosts physical performance in older women

A new study published last month in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that magnesium supplementation can improve physical performance in older women (1).

Compared with the placebo group, the magnesium group made significant improvements in all measures of physical performance
“Compared with the placebo group, the magnesium group made significant improvements in all measures of physical performance”

A focus on healthy ageing is paramount because the UK population is getting older. Currently one-in-six of the UK population is aged 65 and over. By 2050, this number will reach one-in-four. Life expectance is steadily increasing. Unfortunately ‘healthy life expectancy’, or years free from disability, is not increasing at the same rate (2). Good nutrition is a critical component of healthy ageing, allowing us to take charge of our health and remain fit and independent in later life.

This particular study tested the effect of magnesium on older women’s ability to carry out everyday functional movements such as lifting and carrying, alongside other measures of strength and balance.

The researchers studied a group of 139 healthy women with an average age of 71. Each of the women underwent a gentle 12-week exercise programme. While half of the women were given a placebo pill, the remainder of the group were given a daily magnesium supplement.

At the beginning and end of the study, each of the participants were tested for measures of physical performance. Simple functional movements, such as getting out of a chair and balancing tasks, were assessed. Compared with the placebo group, the magnesium group made significant improvements in all measures of physical performance.

The magnesium group also made ‘substantial’ improvements in walking speed compared to the placebo group. This result was of particular interest to the researchers because walking speed is an independent predictor of adverse health events.

The benefits of supplementation were most pronounced in those women whose diets were deficient in magnesium. However, improvements were also noted in those whose magnesium intake met the Recommended Daily Allowance.

As we age, we have a tendency to lose muscle mass. This degenerative loss of muscle mass, known as sarcopenia, robs older people of independence by limiting mobility and the ability safely to carry out simple functional movements. “These findings suggest a role for magnesium supplementation in preventing or delaying the age-related decline in physical performance, particularly in magnesium-deficient individuals”, wrote the researchers.

Magnesium is involved in more physiological processes than any other mineral. It plays a critical role in energy production, bone and tooth formation, muscle function, cardiovascular health, bowel function and blood sugar regulation.

Unfortunately the average women in the UK does not manage to obtain the recommended amount of magnesium through her diet, and older women are even more at risk of deficiency (3). Eliminating refined grains, sugar and other processed foods from the diet goes a long way towards ensuring a good intake of magnesium. Magnesium supplements, and increased intake of magnesium-rich leafy greens, beans and lentils, can also help address deficiencies.

This particular study used magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide, at a dosage of 300mg elemental magnesium. While magnesium oxide is cheap, it is not the most bioavailable form of magnesium. Magnesium citrate or magnesium malate, which demonstrate superior bioavailability, are often considered more helpful by nutritionists.

References

  1. Veronese N, et al. Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on physical performance in healthy elderly women involved in a weekly exercise program: a randomised controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Epub 9 July 2014
  2. Cracknell R (2010) The ageing population. Key Issues for the New Parliament. House of Commons Library Research.
  3. Food Standard Agency. (2011) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: adults over 65 years.

Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Dietary magnesium reduces risk of stroke

Recent research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found new evidence of a link between magnesium intake and risk of stroke.

The research was conducted at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. It took the form of a meta-analysis, whereby researchers collect and analyse data from many previous relevant studies. In all, the researchers took data from studies conducted from 1996 to 2011, involving more than 240,000 adults. Each study tracked adults from Europe, Asia or the United States, and lasted an average of 12 years. The data tracked how much magnesium each person took, and how many people suffered a stroke.

Leafy vegetables contain high levels of dietary magnesium
Leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, spinach and kale, contain high levels of dietary magnesium (2.)

The research team found that those with a higher level of dietary magnesium were less likely to experience a stroke. In fact, the risk of stroke was reduced by 8% for each additional 100 milligrams of magnesium a person consumed each day.

“Dietary magnesium intake is inversely associated with risk of stroke, specifically ischemic stroke”, concluded lead researched Susanna Larsson, adding that “the results suggest that people should eat a healthy diet with magnesium-rich foods such as green leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and whole grains.”

Larsson also maintains that the other dietary factors might also have influenced the findings. After all, those whose diets are high in magnesium-rich foods are also likely to have higher intake or absorption of other nutrients, such as dietary fibre and folate. Hopefully, further large controlled trials of magnesium supplementation will clarify the link.

There are of course a number of reasons why magnesium in particular may help reduce the risk of stroke. Strokes are said to be caused by conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetic complications, all of which are linked with low magnesium. This mineral is essential for keeping blood vessels strong and preventing blood from clotting. The UK recommended intake for magnesium is currently 270mg for women and 300mg for men, although it is estimated that many of us in the UK do not manage to reach these levels in our diet.

The best way to ensure that you are getting enough dietary magnesium is to follow the below guidelines:

• Eat a wide variety of vegetables daily, including greens such as kale, spinach and chard.
• Include beans, legumes, nuts and seeds as magnesium-rich sources of protein.
• Include a variety of wholegrains, such as oats, buckwheat, barley, rye and quinoa.
• Choose animal foods that are magnesium-rich, such as halibut and mackerel.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

Reference
(1.) Larsson S, Orsini N and Wolk A. Dietary magnesium intake and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Feb 2012.

(2.) Image courtesy of Dan

 

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