Tag Archives: children

Optibac: Children and probiotics

There’s a lot of buzz about the benefits of bacteria in the media, particularly for children, but this can be a confusing issue for many people. Why would you ever want to give your child bacteria to improve their health? Aren’t bacteria bad for us, causing infections and stomach upsets?

The simple answer is No! Not all bacteria are bad; in fact mounting evidence suggests that starting out with a healthy balance of friendly flora in their intestines could help to improve your child’s health and actually reduce the risk of infections and other health conditions as they grow up. Even better, having plenty of good gut flora (bacteria) is being linked to good long-term health.

So how do these microscopic microflora help to improve your child’s health?

It may seem weird, but the average human being is a home to literally trillions of bacteria who live all over our bodies, but most plentifully in the moist, warm areas in our intestines. Symbiotic, or ‘friendly’ bacteria are those that live in harmony with our bodies – we provide them with a home and food to eat, and they in turn offer us a host of health benefits.

Though we are typically born without any bacteria in residence, they begin to colonise in our bodies within a few days of birth. The first bacterial settlers are passed on to babies by their mother as they pass down the birth canal during a normal vaginal delivery.

These tiny passengers have been shown to have many positive effects in the body ; they work with the immune system helping to modulate immune responses, reducing the risk of allergies and protecting against infections and viruses. They help to improve digestive function, alleviating diarrhoea or constipation and helping to improve metabolism and nutrient absorption.

Studies have indicated that numerous health benefits may be seen in children who were given probiotic supplements, including a reduction in childhood illnesses and allergic symptoms such as eczema.

If children take on beneficial bacteria during birth, why are probiotic supplements necessary?

In an ideal world, we wouldn’t need to give supplements, but many factors can affect the integrity of a child’s gut flora. If the mother’s intestinal flora is compromised in any way, then the bacteria passed on to a baby may be unbalanced from the start. Vaginal infections during pregnancy, antibiotics, poor diet and even stress can all impact the delicate populations of probiotic bacteria in our intestines.

Additionally, those babies delivered by Caesarian section will not have the benefit of bacteria from mum, and often suffer from digestive problems or allergies such as eczema as a result. Any antibiotics given to your baby or child will kill off good as well as bad bacteria, and consequently can negatively affect their populations of friendly flora.

Why use supplements?

Isn’t it enough just to give your child yoghurt every day?
It’s true that fermented foods such as yoghurt, kefir and sauerkraut have formed an important part of the human diet in most cultures for hundreds of years, and it’s still a good idea for most people to include these as part of a healthy diet.

But it’s often difficult to ascertain the levels of bacteria present in fermented foods; which species are present and how viable they are once consumed. Many of the bacteria found in fermented foods are typically ‘transient’, meaning that they have beneficial effects as they pass through the digestive system, but can’t be guaranteed to become resident in the intestines and restore the balance of flora present.

The bacterial strains used in OptiBac Probiotics products undergo stringent tests that guarantee they will adhere to the intestinal wall, and form new colonies, meaning that they’re likely to offer longer-lasting health beneifits.

So where do we find these so-called ‘friendly bacteria?’ in a supplement form?

The good news is that the folk at OptiBac Probiotics have made it very easy for you to add probiotic bacteria into your child’s daily healthcare regime.

They offer a specific product designed to be taken by children from 0-12 years, which comes in a powder neatly packaged in a handy sachet form. Unlike many other similar products, the sachets do not require refrigeration and are easy to add to a little water, milk or yoghurt.

To ensure that really helpful species of bacteria are passed on to their babies, we also recommend that mums-to-be take ‘For babies & children’ during the final trimester of pregnancy.

Breast-feeding mums can continue to take the product as evidence suggests that the bacteria continues to be passed on to baby via breast milk, or the product can be given directly to infants from birth.

Bifidobacteria infantis has been identified as one of the early settlers in a healthy child’s gut, which is why it is included in ‘For babies & children’ which is gluten-free and suitable for those with lactose intolerance.

So the question is not why would you give your child probiotic bacteria, but given the evidence supporting their use, why wouldn’t you?

Kerry Beeson BSc (Nut. Med.) BANT CNHC
Nutritional Therapist

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Your Child’s Health Checklist

It can be difficult getting your kid’s into a back to school mind-set after the summer holidays, so why not prepare them in advance by boosting the mental and physical performance of your little one with a diet packed with vitamins and nutrients and regular exercise over the next 6 weeks.

Follow our checklist to help you give your child a head start of their next school year:

  • Its summer so make sure your little one gets a small dose of vitamin D courtesy of the sun (all fair-skinned people need is a few minutes of sun on their hands, arms and face every day). However, if the sun isn’t shining, then be sure to include it in their diet through fatty fish, like salmon and tuna, and egg yolks.
  • Children need calcium to make strong bones, but they can only deposit this calcium until their early 20s. Make sure yours get their three servings a day – a serve is a 250ml glass of milk, a 200g tub of yoghurt or two slice of cheese (40g).
  • Poor concentration, failing memory, hyperactivity and mood swings can also be an indication of omega 3 (EPA and DHA) deficiency. Our brains need these long-chain omega-3 fatty acids for brain structure and function. Try supplementing your child’s diet with a kid friendly omega 3 supplement.
  • Iodine deficiency is the world’s most prevalent, yet preventable cause of brain damage and lower IQs according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Make sure your child gets between 90mcg and 120mcg a day. Yoghurt, cow’s milk, eggs, mozzarella cheese and strawberries are excellent sources of iodine.
  • Magnesium de¬ficiency has been linked with learning difficulties, hyperactivity and insomnia and it’s believed three quarters of children don’t consume enough of this mineral. A half-cup of cooked frozen spinach provides 75mg. You should aim to include 130mg a day.

More Top Tips

  • Exercise, chill time, and regular, nourishing meals and snacks enhance concentration by banishing energy wobbles.
  • Friendly foods include fresh fish, vegetables, pulses, whole grain carbohydrates, nuts, and seeds. Water helps too!
  • Cerebral zappers include sugar, caffeine, soft drinks, junk food, processed foods, excess salt, meat and dairy, and refined or hydrogenated fats and oils (be sure to read the labels!).
  • We all need sleep to function properly, but while adults need eight hours, children need a minimum of 10 hours shut-eye every night. Encourage regular exercise during the day, and participation in age appropriate extracurricular activities after school which will both result in adequate sleep at night.
  • Make sure your child is protected against colds with a drink of Manuka Honey and fresh lemon juice in hot water. Echinacea will also support the immune system, prevent infections, and minimise the risk of bronchitis and sinusitis.
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Fertility and Pregnancy Support – From Conception to Birth

Conception

Making the decision to have children may sometimes be easier than getting pregnant. There are many potential causes of infertility, with fertility problems affecting either the man or the woman. Common causes of infertility in women include lack of regular ovulation and endometriosis, and in men the most common cause is poor quality of semen.

Optimum nutrition is absolutely vital for conception and food supplements are useful where an additional intake of specific nutrients is required. AnteNatal Forte provides a combination of nutrients designed to support a woman throughout conception and pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. It is free from vitamin A for those wishing to avoid it, but supplies beta carotene which the body can convert to vitamin A as required. It contains zinc to support normal fertility and reproduction, vitamin B6 which contributes to the regulation of hormonal activity, and folic acid which contributes to normal maternal tissue growth during pregnancy.

ASC Plus provides a combination of synergistic nutrients to support male fertility, including L-arginine, vitamin E, L-taurine, L-Carnitine, zinc and selenium. Zinc supports normal fertility and reproduction, whilst selenium contributes to normal spermatogenesis – the process in which sperm is produced.

Pregnancy

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Pregnancy and omega-3 – a clever combination for baby’s brain

Assuming normal fertility, the next challenge is pregnancy, where there are significant biological changes which occur including an increased demand for nutrients such as vitamin D, B12, folic acid, iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc.

A healthy baby begins with a healthy mum – eating a well-balanced and varied diet that includes fresh fruit and vegetables, wholegrains, pulses and fish will help to provide the nutrients that you and your baby need. Where an additional intake of nutrients is required, a specific pregnancy supplement can be useful. Pregnancy & Lactation Formula is designed to offer comprehensive nutritional support to women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It includes folic acid at recommended levels along with vitamin B12, iron, zinc and vitamin A at a level considered safe in pregnancy. It’s also important to avoid harmful habits such as smoking and excessive caffeine or alcohol consumption to help reduce the risk of any pregnancy complications.

Pregnancy and omega-3 – a clever combination for baby’s brain…

NHS recommendations suggest that eating fish during pregnancy is beneficial to your health as well as the development of your baby. However it is suggested that you should avoid consuming more than 2 portions of oily fish per week as it may contain pollutants. Omega-3 fatty acids provide EPA and DHA – maternal intake of DHA has been shown to contribute to normal brain and eye development of the foetus and breastfed infants, making its intake rather important.

Mega EPA is a naturally concentrated fish oil of outstanding quality and high potency. Each capsule provides omega-3 fatty acids in a natural triglyceride form, perfect for everyday use. It is of outstanding purity and free from detectable contaminants, so can safely be used during pregnancy and whilst breastfeeding.

Arrival of the newborn

Some expectant mothers choose to take probiotics throughout their pregnancy, as well as give them to their newborn baby. AnteNatal BioFlora is a clinically proven probiotic for pregnant women containing LAB4B – a specific and clinically proven blend of probiotic bacteria. It has been designed to be used particularly during the last trimester of pregnancy, and provides a guaranteed 10 billion live bacteria per daily intake. Baby BioFlora is an easy-to-use powder and contains the same specialist blend of LAB4B probiotics as AnteNatal BioFlora with the addition of G.O.S (galactooligosaccharide) which is found in high concentrations within breast milk. It is suitable to be given to babies from birth and can be used to help establish intestinal microflora in newborns up to 12 months.

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Natural Immune Support for Children

Children frequently pick up and pass on common bacterial and viral infections, often through interaction with others at school which can manifest into sore throats, colds, flu, sinusitis and more. Unfortunately large numbers of these children are prescribed antibiotics repeatedly. With the current concern over antibiotic resistance, it is natural to want to avoid having your child take antibiotics if possible.

There are a number of natural ways to reduce the risk of your children picking up illnesses. The very best insurance to help prevent you and your children getting ill is to support the immune system through diet, nutrients and lifestyle.

Here are 5 ways to boost children’s immunity naturally:

1. Wash hands but don’t be a germaphobe: Good hygiene at school and at home is important to help reduce the spread of germs. Washing hands is particularly easy and effective. However, extreme hygiene practices may have a negative effect on your child’s maturing immunity.

Strawberry's, melons and berries are all high in Vitamin C
Strawberries, melons and berries are all high in Vitamin C

2. Eat foods packed with immune-boosting nutrients: Serve nutrient-dense foods to help boost your children’s immunity. A few nutrients can be essential to supporting a balanced immune system. Vitamin C can be found not only in citrus fruits, but also in broccoli, kale, green beans, berries, cantaloupe, strawberries, melons and zinc, which supports immune cell function. Foods such as pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and seafood are all rich in zinc. Probiotic foods such as natural organic yogurt balance gut flora and are essential to a well functioning immune system.

3. Reduce refined carbohydrates and sugary foods: Refined carbohydrates like pasta, bread, biscuits and cakes and sugary foods like soda and candy can seriously tax the immune system. They feed bacterial growth and contribute to inflammation, which depletes and exhausts immune function.

4. Exercise: Research has shown that moderate exercise improves immune function for all ages. Turning off the TV, limiting the video games and getting the kids outdoors are great ways to boost children’s immunity naturally.

5. Try natural immune support nutrients and supplements: Bee Propolis is an immune boosting plant-based nutrient that is safe and effective for children. This resin is collected by bees, from tree and plant buds and has natural antibiotic, antiviral and antibacterial properties. Olive leaf extract and black elderberry are also full of antimicrobial nutrients and are also safe for all ages. Bee Prepared Immune Support Daily Defence combines these ingredients and other equally beneficial nutrients which support immune health. Capsules may be swallowed or broken open and put into juices, smoothies or yogurt.

A practical, delicious and child-friendly way to include a few of these recommendations into your daily routine is with an immune boosting smoothie.

Immunity Smoothie Ingredients:

  • 1 apple, cored, peeled and sliced
  • 1 orange, peeled and seeded
  • 1/2 cup filtered water or organic apple juice
  • 1/2 cup natural yogurt
  • 2 tsp manuka honey
  • 1 tbsp pumpkin seed butter *optional
  • 1 (2-inch) piece of fresh ginger root, peeled
  • 1 capsule Bee Prepared Daily Defence (open capsule and use the powder)

Combine all of these ingredients in a blender, serve and enjoy!

References:
1. Image courtesy of Roger Kirby.

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Back to School: Children’s Nutrition Tips

The month of September means Back to School for children, and is a good time to think about your children’s nutritional needs to see them through the academic year in good health. After all healthy children are not only more likely to grow into healthy adults, but are more likely do better in school too (1). We all know that children need a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and veg, but putting this into practice can be a struggle for many parents. Fortunately there are a few lunchbox ideas that can encourage even the fussiest of eaters.

Healthy packed lunches for kids
Healthy packed lunches for kids don’t have to be “obvious”. Trying hiding grated carrots with grated Red Leicester cheese in a sandwich for example!

Suzannah Olivier, author of “Healthy Food for Happy Kids” suggests that making food fun and offering variety is key to encouraging your child to eat healthily (2). “The best way to avoid faddiness is to give your child a variety of foods, tastes and flavours from a young age”. Here are some quick and easy alternatives to the traditional sandwich:

• Use leftover pasta, couscous or rice for a salad in a box with chopped sausages, tomatoes or black-eyed beans and red peppers.
• Try oatcakes with hummus and cherry tomatoes
• Make some Bircher Muesli: in a container mix 2 tablespoons of oat flakes, chopped nuts (if your school allows these), half a grated apple and some milk or soya milk and seal. By lunchtime the mixture will be soft and sweet and utterly delicious.
• As most kids love finger foods, this can be great way of boosting their veg intake. Try baby carrots or carrot sticks, cherry tomatoes, cucumber wedges, baby sweetcorn, cooked green beans, red and yellow pepper strips, cooked asparagus spears, raw sugar snap peas. Provide a dip to dunk them into, such as hummus or a yoghurt dip.

Even ‘anti-veg’ children can be persuaded to eat their greens with a few inventive lunch options. Suzannah suggests small cubes of vegetable omelette, onion bahjis, mini vegetable pizzas or quiches, vegetable samosas or spring rolls and mushroom pate.

Karen Bali, author of “The Art of Hiding Vegetables” agrees that when dealing with fussy kids, a little stealth can go a long way (3). “All you need to do is disguise or conceal healthy food and your children’s won’t notice – or even know – they’re eating it.” Karen offers the following ideas for packed lunches:

• Include smoothies made with yoghurt and fresh fruit (and no added sugar)
• Warm some vegetable baby food and add to tomato soup, for veggies with ‘no lumpy bits’. Keep it warm until lunch in a flask.
• Disguise carrots by grating them finely and mixing them with finely grated red cheese (such as Leicester) in sandwich fillings
• Choose vegetables with mild flavours – watercress, thinly sliced cucumber and finely shredded lettuce can work well.

For parents interested in nutritional supplements for their children, there are a number of ranges now specifically designed with children’s nutritional needs in mind. While supplements are not intended as a replacement for healthy food, they can help to ensure that your child is meeting his or her nutritional requirements. Parents often ask me which supplements I recommend for children. There are in fact three types of supplements that I have come to refer to as the Children’s Healthy Trinity: probiotics, essential fatty acids and a broad spectrum multi-vitamin and mineral formula. Alongside a healthy diet, these basic supplements can go a long way towards supporting your child’s digestion and immune system, and safeguarding against any nutritional deficiencies in his or her diet.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

References

1. Kleinman et al (2002) Diet, Breakfast, and Academic Performance in Children. Ann Nutr Metab. 2002; 46(Suppl 1): 24–30
2. Suzannah Olivier. Healthy Foods for Happy Kids. Simon & Schuster 2004.
3. Karen Bali & Sally Child. The Art of Hiding Vegetables: Sneaky Ways to Feed Your Children Healthy Food. White Ladder Press 2005.

 

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