Tag Archives: bloating

Digestive Health

Digestive Health – Beat the Bloat

Beat the bloat – Taking care of your digestive health

Indigestion covers a variety of symptoms from cramping in the stomach, to heartburn, bloating, wind, belching, and even pain in the bowel. It is usually a sign that the digestive system is having difficulty coping with breaking down food, and this is frequently due to a lack of stomach acid and digestive enzymes in the small intestine. The problem can be made worse if you eat too quickly and don’t chew food thoroughly. Overeating, drinking to excess, eating poor food combinations, or eating when stressed all exacerbate indigestion. Our digestive processes are only fully functional when our nervous system is relaxed, so when we are stressed enzyme activity decreases significantly, which can lead to various symptoms including bloating.

What are digestive enzymes and how can they help?

Digestive enzymes act like scissors to break down food (fats, proteins, carbohydrates, starches, milk, sugars) into their basic building blocks so that they can be absorbed into the bloodstream and transported throughout the body and cells. Undigested food can putrefy in the intestines, feeding undesirable micro-organisms which produce gas, bloating and toxins detrimental to the body. When undigested food particles are absorbed into the blood stream, the immune system produces antibodies to attack them along with secondary effects like inflammation, pains, migraines, rashes, asthma, behavioural changes and other symptoms of food intolerance/allergies. Diets lacking in raw foods and heavily processed/packaged foods devoid of essential enzymes often lead to symptoms of indigestion, bloating, acid reflux, IBS, fatigue and candida. By supplementing with digestive enzymes you support the digestive system by breaking down food into its basic building blocks for proper assimilation.

What are microbiotics and how can they help?

Microbiotics are the “good” or “friendly” bacteria that are normal inhabitants of the intestinal tract. Although the word bacteria is usually associated with germs and illness, friendly bacteria help the body to function, maintain health and fight infection. “Bad” or “pathogenic” bacteria on the other hand can cause intestinal microflora imbalances and lead to symptoms such as bloating, intestinal infections, yeast imbalance, constipation, diarrhoea and flatulence. Research is establishing the importance of supplementing with microbiotics. They not only help to balance out the gut bacteria, but they help to support the immune function of the gut, produce antioxidants, aid nutrition through the enhanced breakdown and absorption of vitamins, minerals and amino acids and they synthesize B vitamins, which are necessary for a healthy nervous system.

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IBS Awareness

April is IBS Awareness Month. This calendar event is aimed at heightening awareness of the causes and symptoms of IBS, and the treatment options available. It also encourages sufferers to talk about their condition and take positive steps to manage their symptoms.

Painful tummy
IBS can cause symptoms such as gas, bloating, constipation and / or diarrhoea

The exact cause is unknown, but attacks can be triggered by stress and dietary factors. Typical symptoms of IBS or Irritable Bowel Syndrome include abdominal pain, a sense of urgency (having to rush to the toilet), bloating and gas, and diarrhoea or constipation.

Might you have IBS?

Learn your ABC for IBS! The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) advises that anyone experiencing the following symptoms for 6 months or longer should be assessed for IBS:

  • Abdominal pain or discomfort
  • Bloating
  • Change in bowel habit

Common myths and misconceptions

There are many misconceptions about IBS, perhaps because many people find IBS difficult or embarrassing to talk about. A clear understanding of IBS can help sufferers to manage the condition more effectively.

1. MYTH: IBS is “all in the head”

FACT: For many years, doctors believed IBS was a psychological condition, only existing in the patient’s head. This misconception is damaging for patients who require practical help to manage IBS. Fortunately physicians now have a better understanding of the condition and can offer practical approaches to relieve symptoms.

2. MYTH: IBS is not a serious condition

FACT: IBS is not life-threatening, and it is not an inflammatory disease like Crohn’s or Ulcerative Colitis. However, IBS can significantly impact a person’s quality of life and ability to function on a day-to-day basis. These are serious concerns and should be treated as such by your GP.

3. MYTH: IBS is related to lactose intolerance

FACT: IBS and lactose intolerance are not linked, although their symptoms are very similar. Some people suffer with both IBS and lactose intolerance. If your symptoms are relieved by cutting out lactose, or by taking lactase supplements, then it is possible you have lactose intolerance rather than IBS.

4. MYTH: Increasing your fibre intake will help IBS

FACT: Although fibre is an important part of a healthy diet, certain types of fibre can actually trigger IBS symptoms. In IBS, the rough edges of insoluble fibre can irritate the digestive tract, causing abdominal pain and cramps. Swapping foods high in insoluble fibre, such as bran flakes, for foods high in soothing soluble fibre, such as oats, can help to manage painful symptoms.

5. MYTH: IBS cannot be diagnosed

FACT: There is an established protocol that GPs can use to diagnose IBS. By assessing symptoms and ruling out other digestive disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, your doctor can accurately diagnose IBS.

6. MYTH: There are no good treatment options for IBS

FACT: There are several prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications and nutritional supplements that can relieve symptoms for sufferers. Different approaches can work for different people, and it is sometimes necessary to experiment to find what works best for you. Some over the counter medications can actually make symptoms worse if they are used excessively. Dietary and lifestyle changes can make a world of difference. For example, the FODMAP diet has proved helpful to many. Probiotics (especially strains such as Bifidobacterium Infantis), peppermint oil, and soluble fibre supplements such as psyllium husk all represent effective natural approaches to troublesome symptoms.

If you have been diagnosed with IBS then a nutritional therapist can advise you on dietary management and helpful supplements. If you suspect you may have IBS then you should initially speak to your GP. After all, one of the most important messages of IBS Awareness Month is that nobody should have to suffer in silence.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

References

National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults: Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Primary Care. Feb 2008.

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The Sun Chlorella guide to a healthy gut – Part 2

Continuing from Wednesday’s blog post on gut health, the team at Sun Chlorella follow on with the second part of their 10 point guide to the facts and fictions of gut health.

Sun Chlorella - The Ultimate Superfood
Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ is a natural green algae whole food supplement from Japan.

Sun Chlorella expert nutritionist Nadia Brydon, is on hand to separate the fact from the fiction when it comes to keeping your guts healthy.

“The most important thing when managing your digestion is to identify the causes and stop the patterns that lead to pain and discomfort.  Once you know how healthy your gut is you’ll be able to prevent any bloating.” says Nadia.

Don’t eat fruit – FICTION!

Candida overgrowth is a major cause of bloating and is essentially fermentation inside the gut.  Foods that encourage fermentation include sugar and that means sugar in fruit too.  However, not all fruit causes bloating.  Avoid citrus fruits but stock up on bananas, figs, blueberries, mango and papaya instead.

Supplements don’t work – FICTION!

If you are susceptible to bloating and trapped wind there are a number of effective and natural solutions.

Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ – a natural green algae whole food supplement from Japan – is Nadia’s number one choice for bloating as it contains a staggering range of nutrients including around 10% fibre, to help move food through the system more effectively.  Due to its special component – the Chlorella Growth Factor (CGF) – Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ re-stimulates the growth and repair of cells, including the growth of good bacteria (Lactobacilli) four-fold once it’s absorbed, which aids digestive health*.

Nadia explains, “Taking Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ on a daily basis helps to keep the gut healthy and happy by acting as an ‘intestinal broom’ and cleansing the bowel.  Chlorella has the highest known concentration of chlorophyll – the green pigment found in plants that converts water, air and sunlight into energy – and this helps to bind to any toxins in your intestines, preventing absorption and eliminating them as waste.”

Other options include activated charcoal – an age old remedy to help ease the feelings of trapped wind.  Peppermints or warming peppermint tea will ease digestion whilst fennel seed tea or chewing fennel seeds or dill seeds after a meal can also help prevent bloating.

Increase your fibre intake – FACT!

Diet is really important.  Avoid bread and any processed or low glycemic foods and try to eat fresh foods instead.  Cutting down your intake of foods which are low in fibre – and therefore ‘bind’ inside your gut – such as eggs, chocolate, red meat, cheese and processed foods will help reduce bloating too.  A supplement such as Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ also contains fibre which can help to move food through your system.

Sun Chlorella 'A'
“Taking Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ on a daily basis helps to keep the gut healthy and happy by acting as an ‘intestinal broom’ and cleansing the bowel.

Food mixing can lead to bloating – FACT!

Bloating can often be caused by the slowing down of digestion caused by mixing incompatible foods (such as protein and carbohydrates) at meal times – which have different digesting times.  Bread, along with lactose and gluten, is also high on the list of causative factors.

Stress can lead to gut discomfort – FACT!

Stress is a huge factor as it can cause tension in the body which in turn interrupts the digestion process.  Try to find time to unwind at the end of each day – simple breathing exercises, a relaxing bath or even meditation could help the body to de-stress.

* a recent review of research concluded that the potential of chlorella to relieve symptoms, improve quality of life and normalize body functions in patients suffering with ulcerative colitis (a long-term (chronic) condition affecting the colon and causing inflammation of the intestines), suggests that larger, more comprehensive clinical trials of chlorella are warranted; A Review of Recent Clinical Trials of the Nutritional Supplement Chlorella Pyrenoidosa in the Treatment of Fibromyalgia, Hypertension, and Ulcerative Colitis, Randall E Merchant, PhD, and Cynthia A. Andre, MSc

 

Written by Nadia Brydon

 

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The Sun Chlorella guide to a healthy gut – Part 1

Todays blog is provided by the experts at premium supplement brand Sun Chlorella.  In parts 1 and 2, their expert nutritionist discusses the fact and fiction surrounding the topic of gut health.

‘Beat the bloat’  How healthy is your gut?  Fact & Fiction

Many aspirations to get more energised and active in the summer months are often thwarted by the common issue of bloated bellies.  To help our collective tummies beat the bloat, nutritionist Nadia Brydon from premium supplement brand Sun Chlorella, is on hand to separate the fact from the fiction when it comes to keeping your guts healthy.

“The most important thing when managing your digestion is to identify the causes and stop the patterns that lead to pain and discomfort.  Once you know how healthy your gut is you’ll be able to prevent any bloating.” says Nadia.

NADIA BRYDON’S GUT HEALTH FACT & FICTIONS

Sun Chlorella A1
Breathing and exercise are particularly important to help the digestion process and ‘burn’ off the food we eat.

Exercising when bloated will aggravate the condition – FICTION!

Breathing and exercise are particularly important as the gut needs air to help the digestion process and ‘burn’ off the food we eat.  Try to take exercise in the open air for half an hour each day.  If you’re bloated, a gentle walk will give you energy and the movement will facilitate your digestion.  Exercise that focuses on the abdominal muscles or uses controlled breathing is excellent as it strengthens the muscles in this area.

Don’t drink alcohol – FICTION!

If you are heading out for a few drinks just make sure you go prepared. Take Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ to help balance the pH in the gut before you head out, drink plenty of water throughout the night, and try to keep food simple and light.  Keep peppermints and chamomile teabags in your bag to have after your meal.

Eight hours sleep a night will help your tummy – FACT!

Sleep is a must and a good eight hours a night will give optimum benefit. It has been found that those sleeping less than this develop an increased desire for sugary type foods – due to lack of energy – which can ferment in the digestive tract and cause bloating.

Keep hydrated – FACT!

Always remember to drink lots of water throughout the day and try to drink before or after a meal rather than during.  Drinking up to eight glasses of water a day is the best ‘laxative’ nature can provide!

Visit the loo regularly – FACT!

Irregular bowel movements can cause bloating and it is important to empty the bowels on a daily basis.  For each main meal taken in, there should be a bowel movement to make space for the next meal.  Otherwise foods ‘back up’ and ferment leaving the gut feeling full and bloated.  To help keep the bowels regular, eat fibre-rich fresh fruit, vegetables and seeds such as flaxseeds, hemp seeds, sunflower and pumpkin seeds.

Don’t miss the second part of Sun Chlorella guide to a healthy gut in the next bodykind blog on Thursday 4th August 2011.

Written by Nadia Brydon

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