Tag Archives: baby

Fertility and Pregnancy Support – From Conception to Birth

Conception

Making the decision to have children may sometimes be easier than getting pregnant. There are many potential causes of infertility, with fertility problems affecting either the man or the woman. Common causes of infertility in women include lack of regular ovulation and endometriosis, and in men the most common cause is poor quality of semen.

Optimum nutrition is absolutely vital for conception and food supplements are useful where an additional intake of specific nutrients is required. AnteNatal Forte provides a combination of nutrients designed to support a woman throughout conception and pregnancy, especially during the first trimester. It is free from vitamin A for those wishing to avoid it, but supplies beta carotene which the body can convert to vitamin A as required. It contains zinc to support normal fertility and reproduction, vitamin B6 which contributes to the regulation of hormonal activity, and folic acid which contributes to normal maternal tissue growth during pregnancy.

ASC Plus provides a combination of synergistic nutrients to support male fertility, including L-arginine, vitamin E, L-taurine, L-Carnitine, zinc and selenium. Zinc supports normal fertility and reproduction, whilst selenium contributes to normal spermatogenesis – the process in which sperm is produced.

Pregnancy

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Pregnancy and omega-3 – a clever combination for baby’s brain

Assuming normal fertility, the next challenge is pregnancy, where there are significant biological changes which occur including an increased demand for nutrients such as vitamin D, B12, folic acid, iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc.

A healthy baby begins with a healthy mum – eating a well-balanced and varied diet that includes fresh fruit and vegetables, wholegrains, pulses and fish will help to provide the nutrients that you and your baby need. Where an additional intake of nutrients is required, a specific pregnancy supplement can be useful. Pregnancy & Lactation Formula is designed to offer comprehensive nutritional support to women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It includes folic acid at recommended levels along with vitamin B12, iron, zinc and vitamin A at a level considered safe in pregnancy. It’s also important to avoid harmful habits such as smoking and excessive caffeine or alcohol consumption to help reduce the risk of any pregnancy complications.

Pregnancy and omega-3 – a clever combination for baby’s brain…

NHS recommendations suggest that eating fish during pregnancy is beneficial to your health as well as the development of your baby. However it is suggested that you should avoid consuming more than 2 portions of oily fish per week as it may contain pollutants. Omega-3 fatty acids provide EPA and DHA – maternal intake of DHA has been shown to contribute to normal brain and eye development of the foetus and breastfed infants, making its intake rather important.

Mega EPA is a naturally concentrated fish oil of outstanding quality and high potency. Each capsule provides omega-3 fatty acids in a natural triglyceride form, perfect for everyday use. It is of outstanding purity and free from detectable contaminants, so can safely be used during pregnancy and whilst breastfeeding.

Arrival of the newborn

Some expectant mothers choose to take probiotics throughout their pregnancy, as well as give them to their newborn baby. AnteNatal BioFlora is a clinically proven probiotic for pregnant women containing LAB4B – a specific and clinically proven blend of probiotic bacteria. It has been designed to be used particularly during the last trimester of pregnancy, and provides a guaranteed 10 billion live bacteria per daily intake. Baby BioFlora is an easy-to-use powder and contains the same specialist blend of LAB4B probiotics as AnteNatal BioFlora with the addition of G.O.S (galactooligosaccharide) which is found in high concentrations within breast milk. It is suitable to be given to babies from birth and can be used to help establish intestinal microflora in newborns up to 12 months.

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Caffeine linked to low birth weight babies

A new study published in the journal BMC Medicine last month shows that caffeine is linked to low birth weight babies (1).

Caffeine intake is already a concern in pregnancy, with current guidelines recommending that pregnant women restrict themselves to no more than 200mg of caffeine (equivalent to around two cups of coffee) each day.

While the placental barrier does a good job of screening out many infectious agents, it is not able to block environmental pollutants such as pesticides, mercury and PCBs. Likewise, caffeine can cross the placental barrier, resulting in babies that are small for gestational age (SGA).

The study monitored the caffeine intake of more than 60,000 pregnant women. For every 100mg of caffeine each day, the average infant lost an estimated 21-28g. Caffeine intake also increased the length of pregnancy, with caffeine from coffee in particular having the most dramatic effect. This suggests that another substance in coffee may also contribute to the negative effects. For example, decaffeinated coffee retains other stimulants such as theophylline and theobromine.

While coffee is the primary source of caffeine in many diets, there are many other foods and drinks that contribute to overall caffeine intake. This study monitored all sources of caffeine, including coffee, tea, hot chocolate, fizzy drinks, as well as foods such as chocolate and chocolate desserts.

Coffee
Caffeine can cross the placental barrier, resulting in babies that are small for gestational age

As a general guide, a can of coke contains around 30mg caffeine, a cup of tea contains around 50mg caffeine, and a cup of instant coffee contains around 60mg caffeine. ‘Proper’ coffee will provide an even bigger caffeine hit. A medium cup of coffee from a high street coffee chain can contain around 200mg caffeine. For those who regularly visit high street coffee chains it’s important to note that the amount of caffeine in drinks from these stores can vary wildly making it very difficult to determine how much caffeine you are actually drinking.

Staying hydrated is especially important during pregnancy. Drinking plenty of fluids helps lessen the risks of problems such as constipation, urinary infections, fluid retention and haemorrhoids during pregnancy. The volume of blood in your body, which is made mostly of water, also increases during pregnancy.

So what are the best choices of beverage during pregnancy? Water is the most obvious choice for staying hydrated. Keep a bottle at your desk or carry a small bottle in your bag if you’re out and about. If plain water is too boring, try carbonated water and add a slice or two of lemon or lime.

Naturally caffeine-free teas are another good choice. Redbush tea is naturally caffeine free. Peppermint tea can help ease digestive troubles and ginger tea may help to relieve morning sickness. Fruit smoothies using probiotic yoghurt and digestive-boosters such as milled flax seeds is another great option.

Barley water makes a great anti-inflammatory agent for the urinary system which can be more prone to infection during pregnancy. Buy whole barley, put 40g in a litre of water, boil and simmer for 20 minutes. Add a slice of lemon or the juice of one lemon and simmer for a further 10 minutes. Allow to cool, then sip the water throughout the day.

Finally, green smoothies provide all the antioxidants of fruit juice without the sugar hit, and they can be a great source of minerals such as folate and iron which are needed in greater amounts during pregnancy. Try blending a handful of spinach with an avocado, a dash of apple juice, a cup of water, and three tablespoons of plain yoghurt for a refreshing folate and iron-rich green smoothie.

References

1. Sengpiel V et al. (2013) Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with birth weight but not with gestational length: results from a large prospective observational cohort study. BMC Medicine 11:42.

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