Tag Archives: astaxanthin

Sun Protection

More than Sunscreen: Comprehensive Sun Protection

More than Sunscreen: Comprehensive Sun Protection

Most of us welcome the summer months. After all, a healthy dose of sunshine has been linked with better bone health, higher levels of the ‘happy hormone’ serotonin, and improved sleep quality. However, we can have too much of a good thing. A sensible approach to sun protection is essential to prevent premature skin ageing and other damaging effects from too much sun exposure.

Surprisingly, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has reported that sunscreens are linked with a higher risk of melanoma (1). A recent review has supported these findings, linking sunscreen use with increased risk of moles and malignant melanoma (2). The agency suggests that this could be partly because those who wear sunscreen do so in order th48at they can spend longer in the sun. The protective effect of sunscreen is then outweighed by overexposure to the sun, meaning the idea of sun protection for the individual is compromised. The Working Group concluded that sunscreens do indeed protect against skin cancer, but only if consumers use it sensibly, and as only one part of their sun protection strategy:

“Use of sunscreens should be one part of a comprehensive sun avoidance strategy that includes moving into shade when the sun is near zenith and the use of protective clothing.”

Clearly, staying out of direct sunlight when the sun is at its strongest – between the hours of 10am and 2pm – is a sensible measure. Covering up with a light linen shirt and a wide brimmed hat can also offer good sun protection whilst allowing the wearer to stay cool and comfortable.

Recent studies have also investigated ways of protecting the skin from the inside – especially with nutrients that help to protect the skin from free radical damage, increase natural resistance to UVA and UVB light and fight inflammation. Here are three top supplements for inside-out protection:

1. Lycopene

Naturally present in tomatoes, red peppers and grapefruit, lycopene is a carotenoid that neutralises the harmful effects of UV light. Human studies have found that lycopene offers protection against sun damage: women supplementing just 16mg lycopene each day experienced significant sun protection (3). Eating plenty of tomato-based meals can provide a good amount of lycopene each day. Some multivitamin formulas are also fortified with lycopene for additional antioxidant benefits.

2. Astaxanthin

Even more potent than lycopene, astaxanthin is a powerful antioxidant with multiple health benefits. It is produced by microalgae, serving as a protective shield against UV radiation at times when water is sparse and sunlight is strong.

Known as the ‘King of Antioxidants’, astaxanthin is hundreds of times more powerful than other antioxidants such as vitamin E when it comes to quenching oxidative damage from sunlight. Lab studies have confirmed that astaxanthin offers protection from UVA damage, and preliminary human trials have shown that just three weeks of supplementation with 4mg astaxanthin resulted in significant sun protection (4,5).

Omega-3

When your skin is at risk of sun damage, a bodily process called ‘p53 expression’ is triggered to protect it. When this process goes awry, this can result in melanoma. Omega-3 oils appear to protect the skin by regulating this process. Several studies support the sun protection benefits of omega-3 supplementation. People with higher levels of omega-3 in their blood show less sun damage, and 4g of omega-3 daily has been found to reduce sunburn and reduce damaging p53 in the skin (6,7).

One final consideration when using sunscreen is that these protective sun creams also block synthesis of vitamin D. This might be a particular concern for those of us who are careful to use sunscreen regularly – especially as many of us spend a lot of time indoors, and are based in the UK where UV light is not as strong. When using a sunscreen of SPF15 or above, or if regularly using cosmetics and moisturizers with added UV protection, it may be wise to supplement vitamin D in order to ensure sufficient levels throughout the year.

Topical sunscreens are certainly a sensible measure to protect the skin, but the Cancer Research Agency agrees that it is only part of the story. Adding a healthy diet rich in protective antioxidants and skin-healthy nutrients will also help to ensure that your skin is protected from the inside out.

References
1. Vainio H, et al. Cancer-preventive effects of sunscreens are uncertain. Scandinavian Journal of Work and Environmental Health 2000;26(6):529-531
2. Autier P. Sunscreen abuse for intentional sun exposure. Br J Dermatol. 2009;161 Suppl 3:40-5
3. Stahl W et al (2001) Dietary tomato paste protects against ultraviolet light-induced erythema in humans. J Nutr 131(5):1449-51.
4. Lyons NM and O’Brien NM (2002) Modulatory effects of an algal extract containing astaxanthin on UVA-irradiated cells in culture. Journal of Dermatological Science 30(1):73-84
5. Clinical Trial Indicates Sun Protection from BioAstin Supplement. http://www.cyanotech.com/pdfs/bioastin/batl33.pdf
6. van der Pol JC et al (2011) Serum omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and cutaneous p53 expression in an Australian population. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 20(3):530-6.
7. Rhodes LE et al (2003) Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers. Carcinogenesis 24(5):919-925

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Top Selling Supplements of 2013

At bodykind, we have almost 4,000 products available and it’s not always easy choosing from a large range of products so we’ve compiled a list of the Top Selling Supplements of 2013.

Take a look at our Top 5 Supplements and discover our most popular products of 2013.


udos-choice
Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend – Omegas 3, 6 & 9

Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend is a certified organic blend of unrefined seed oils. When included in your daily diet (mixed in with food and drink) it provides the all-important Omega 3 and 6 that are generally damaged or lacking in our regular diets. This blend of Omega 3,6 and 9 provides the nutrition required for optimum health, naturally beautiful skin, lustrous hair and strong nails.

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udos-choiceIgennus Vegepa – Omega 3 and Omega 6

Igennus Vegepa is a patented and highly concentrated formulation of ultra-pure EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) from marine fish oil and GLA (gamma linolenic acid) from organic virgin evening primrose oil, providing an optimal source of omega-3 and omega-6 long-chain fatty acids and botanical triterpenes.

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udos-choicePharma Nord Omega 7 – Sea Buckthorn oil

Omega-7 is prepared from berries of the sea buckthorn plant, a shrub originating in the Himalayas and is used by thousands of people across the UK for dry eyes, dry mouth and intimate dryness. The oil extracted from sea buckthorn berries is a rich source of the essential polyunsaturated omega-7 fatty acids (PUFAs), palmitoleic acid and cis-vaccenic acid. It is also a good source of the PUFAs alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3 type), linoleic acid (omega-6 type), and oleic acid (omega-9 type).

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udos-choiceLepicol – Healthy Bowels Formula

Lepicol Healthy Bowels Formula is a completely natural high fibre food for help maintaining and sustaining healthy bowels. Lepicol Healthy Bowels Formula has been formulated to help support the cleansing and regulation of the bowels in a gentle, natural way and is suitable for regular, everyday use.

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udos-choiceNutrex BioAstin – Hawaiian Astaxanthin

BioAstin Hawaiian Astaxanthin gel caps are an incredibly potent natural supplement. It supports cardiovascular health, healthy immune function, joint and tendon health, skin health, and eye and brain health. No other antioxidant can compare to the energy boosting powers of BioAstin Hawaiian Astaxanthin. One gel cap per day will help keep your body strong and full of powerful energy-boosting antioxidants.
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Treating and Managing Hay Fever With Natural Products

Seasonal allergies affect millions of people in the UK each year with aggravating symptoms such as sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, running nose and itchy skin. These hay fever symptoms are the result of the immune system’s reaction to harmless pollen particles in the same way it would respond to harmful antigens. In this immune response, immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE) detect the pollen ‘antigens’ and activate mast cells and T helper cells (specifically type 2 or Th2 cells). The increase of Th2 cells and the mast cell histamine release in the mucosa and peripheral blood result in inflammation, hay fever symptoms and atopic conditions.

UnBEElievable Bee Products
UnBEElievable Bee Products including MAX Strength and DAILY Defence contain many of the ingredients that helps to support you in the Hay Fever season

Conventionally, hay fever is managed by using anti­-histamine drugs to reduce symptoms. However, a more holistic and curative approach to treating hay fever is to modulate the immune system, reduce the histamine response and to focus on reducing inflammation. Certain nutrients and natural remedies can be helpful in achieving these therapeutic goals and in creating a long term, effective treatment for hay fever and other atopic conditions.

Elderberry has been used medicinally for centuries in the UK and in Europe. Elderberry is widely known for its effective use in treating viral infections. Elderberry is also rich in Vitamin C and the bioflavonoid quercetin, both of which are powerful antioxidant and anti-histamine nutrients. These actions can help to reduce mast cell histamine response and reduce mucosa inflammation. Recent clinical studies have found elderberry effective at treating allergic sinusitis and rhinitis.

Reishi mushroom has been used historically as an immune tonic in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Scientific researchers in the western world are now beginning to understand the active constituents that are responsible for the mushroom’s immune supporting actions. Reishi contains the bioflavonoid triterpene which inhibits histamine release. It also contains oleic acid and cyclooctasulphur compound which have antihistamine actions. In addition to these anti-­-allergic actions, reishi contains antioxidant and anti-­inflammatory phytonutrients which may be helpful in reducing hay fever symptoms.

Astaxanthin is a carotenoid found naturally in algae. Studies have shown that astaxanthin is effective in modulating the immune system, specifically siting its role in balancing the Th1 and Th2 cells. By rebalancing these T helper cells, astaxanthin aids in reducing the hypersensitivity to pollen allergens. Astaxanthin is also a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrient. These actions may help to reduce the symptoms related to the inflammation of the mucosa.

Bee propolis contains a broad spectrum of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. It also has significant immunomodulating and anti-­inflammatory actions. Propolis is one of nature’s most potent anti-­oxidant substances, exceeding Vitamin E in anti-­oxidant actions. Propolis also has been found to effectively modulate the immune system without over stimulating it. The combination of these actions may be helpful in creating a long term treatment for hay fever.

Written by Erin McCann NT mBANT from UnBEElieveable Health and Being-Balanced

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Summer is on its way – Part 2: Sun protection through nutrition

Protecting your skin from the sun’s harmful rays doesn’t stop with applying sun creams.  There is a wide range of things we can do nutritionally to protect our bodies from the inside out.

Mediterranean diet
A Mediterranean diet rich in fish, whole grains, beans/pulses, vegetables, fruits and olive oil is full of antioxidants and omega 3 fatty acids. (2)

Many people admire the olive complexions of our Mediterranean neighbours although it is their diets that we should perhaps pay the most attention to.  Dr Niva Shapira writes on the importance of antioxidants and omega 3 fatty acids for the protection against sun damage to the skin (1).  She comments that in Mediterranean regions the rate of melanoma skin cancers is low even though the solar radiation is high, and that much of the protection against sun damage comes from the diet.  The paper concentrates on the traditional Greek-style Mediterranean diet (3) which is rich in fish, whole grains, beans/pulses, vegetables, fruits and olive oil.  Long chain omega 3 fatty acids are used by the body for the production of potent anti inflammatory chemicals and may help to reduce sun induced inflammation, UVB skin sensitivity and may also help in the prevention of sunburn.

Antioxidants, vitamins and flavonoids may help to ‘quench’ destructive molecules that lead to sun damage.  Vegetables and fruits, especially the colourful ones, contain an array of different antioxidants so be sure to get your five a day.

Beta carotene, lycopene and lutein are carotenoids that seem to be particularly effective for protecting against sun damage.  Good sources include carrots, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, squash, peppers, cantaloupe melons, nectarines, papaya, mango and dark green vegetables.

Astaxanthin is a red-coloured ‘carotenoid’ that causes lobsters, flamingos and salmon to be a deep shade of pink.  It also happens to be a great filter for UVA and UVB light.

Astaxanthin supplements may be the perfect addition to help those with fair skin and who are prone to sunburn, protect themselves from the sun.  Used alongside sun creams it may help to lessen the reaction to UV light that causes itchy, raised patches called hives or UV urticaria.

Higher Nature Astaxanthin & Black Currant
Blackcurrant contains more anthocyanodins, vitamins C, E and polyphenols than even Blueberries.

A nice addition to Astaxanthin is Blackcurrant extract. Blackcurrant contains more anthocyanodins, vitamins C, E and polyphenols than even Blueberries, which is why the two ingredients are so good for the effects of sunlight on the macula at the back of the eye.

Anthocyanodins also protect connective tissue by maintaining its elasticity, something lost in prematurely ageing skin.  This means that they are ideally combined when someone needs to protect their skin in the long term from the damage UVA and UVB rays can cause.

The most important thing to remember when enjoying the sun shine this year though is to be sensible and safe.  If you have been out in the sun for a while, go and get some shade.  Wear adequate clothing, keep well hydrated and avoid prolonged sun bathing.  That way you will be in tip top condition to make the most of those precious hours of sunshine!

 

(1)  Shapira N.  2010.  Nutritional approach to sun protection: a suggested complement to external strategies.  Nutrition Reviews.  68:75-86.

(2) Image Courtesy of m_bartosch.

(3)  Ani Richardson (BSc, MSc Nutritional Medicine, RNutr). Mediterranean diet comes up top again.  bodykind Blog, May 4th 2011.

Written by Mike Pye

 

 

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