Dietary magnesium reduces risk of stroke

Recent research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found new evidence of a link between magnesium intake and risk of stroke.

The research was conducted at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. It took the form of a meta-analysis, whereby researchers collect and analyse data from many previous relevant studies. In all, the researchers took data from studies conducted from 1996 to 2011, involving more than 240,000 adults. Each study tracked adults from Europe, Asia or the United States, and lasted an average of 12 years. The data tracked how much magnesium each person took, and how many people suffered a stroke.

Leafy vegetables contain high levels of dietary magnesium
Leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, spinach and kale, contain high levels of dietary magnesium (2.)

The research team found that those with a higher level of dietary magnesium were less likely to experience a stroke. In fact, the risk of stroke was reduced by 8% for each additional 100 milligrams of magnesium a person consumed each day.

“Dietary magnesium intake is inversely associated with risk of stroke, specifically ischemic stroke”, concluded lead researched Susanna Larsson, adding that “the results suggest that people should eat a healthy diet with magnesium-rich foods such as green leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and whole grains.”

Larsson also maintains that the other dietary factors might also have influenced the findings. After all, those whose diets are high in magnesium-rich foods are also likely to have higher intake or absorption of other nutrients, such as dietary fibre and folate. Hopefully, further large controlled trials of magnesium supplementation will clarify the link.

There are of course a number of reasons why magnesium in particular may help reduce the risk of stroke. Strokes are said to be caused by conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetic complications, all of which are linked with low magnesium. This mineral is essential for keeping blood vessels strong and preventing blood from clotting. The UK recommended intake for magnesium is currently 270mg for women and 300mg for men, although it is estimated that many of us in the UK do not manage to reach these levels in our diet.

The best way to ensure that you are getting enough dietary magnesium is to follow the below guidelines:

• Eat a wide variety of vegetables daily, including greens such as kale, spinach and chard.
• Include beans, legumes, nuts and seeds as magnesium-rich sources of protein.
• Include a variety of wholegrains, such as oats, buckwheat, barley, rye and quinoa.
• Choose animal foods that are magnesium-rich, such as halibut and mackerel.

Written by Nadia Mason, BSc MBANT NTCC CNHC

Reference
(1.) Larsson S, Orsini N and Wolk A. Dietary magnesium intake and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Feb 2012.

(2.) Image courtesy of Dan

 

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