Sun Chlorella: How to cope with the snooze you lose

Sleep trouble? Could Sun Chlorella help?

Most people will experience problems sleeping at some point in their life and it is thought that around a third of Brits suffer with chronic insomnia.

Many things can contribute to a sleepless night – stress, diet, environment and lifestyle factors – but when we do find ourselves tossing and turning into the small hours of the night, it can be all too tempting to reach for the sleeping pills – but a report published by a leading mental health charity suggested that Britain has become a nation of ‘sleeping pill addicts’.

Reduce your risk of becoming addicted to these pills and try something natural instead, such as Sun Chlorella. Research from across the globe has suggested that some whole foods may improve sleep quality by up to 42% . So before you pop those prescription pills, take a look at these tips from Sun Chlorella Holistic Nutritionist Nikki Hillis who has shared some of her favourite foods to help you achieve a longer, deeper sleep.

Sun Chl  1. Chlorella

It might seem bizarre but an algae supplement such as Sun Chlorella® is rich in chlorophyll that contains high amounts of B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, tryptophan and omega 3 fatty acids, all essential nutrients for quality sleep.

A recent study by Oxford University showed that the participants on a course of daily supplements of omega-3 had nearly one hour more sleep and seven fewer waking episodes per night compared with the participants taking the placebo.

Furthermore, the tryptophan found in chlorella is a sleep-enhancing amino acid used by the brain to produce neurotransmitters serotonin and melatonin that help you relax and go to sleep. While young people have the highest melatonin levels, production of this hormone wanes as we age. Calcium and magnesium relax the body and B vitamins are essential for stress relief.

nuts2. Nuts and Seeds

Almonds, walnuts, chia seeds and sesame seeds are rich in magnesium and calcium – two minerals that help promote sleep. Walnuts are also a good source of tryptophan. The unsaturated fats found in nuts improve your serotonin levels, and the protein in the nuts help maintain a stable blood sugar level to prevent you waking in the night. 100 grams of sesame seeds boasts over 1000 micrograms of tryptophan. The same amount of chia seeds have over 700 mgs of tryptophan, while pumpkin seeds have almost 600 mg.

3. Herbal teas (such as Chamomile, Passionflower, Valerian, Lavender, Lemongrass)

Valerian is one of the most common sleep remedies for insomnia. Numerous studies have found that valerian improves deep sleep, speed of falling asleep, and overall quality of sleep. Lemongrass’ calming properties have been long revered to ward off nightmares while chamomile tea is used regularly worldwide for insomnia, irritability, and restlessness.

kiwi 4. Kiwi Fruit

Research suggests that eating kiwi fruit may have significant benefits for sleep due to its high antioxidant and serotonin levels. Researchers at Taiwan’s Taipei Medical University studied the effects of kiwi consumption on sleep and found that eating kiwi on a daily basis was linked to substantial improvements to both sleep quality and sleep quantity. After 4 weeks of kiwi consumption, researchers found that the amount of time it takes to fall asleep after going to bed decreased by 35.4%, the amount of time spent in periods of wakefulness after initially falling asleep fell 28.9% and the total time spent asleep among the volunteers increased by 13.4%.

5. Honey

Honey promotes a truly deep and restorative sleep. If you take a teaspoon or two of honey before bed, you’ll be re-stocking your liver with glycogen so that your brain doesn’t activate a stress response, which often occurs when glycogen is low. Honey also contributes to the release of melatonin in the brain, as it leads to a slight spike in insulin levels and the release of tryptophan in the brain.

Sun Chlorella 'A' 6. Sun Chlorella Sound Asleep Smoothie
Smoothies are a popular and satisfying breakfast but we rarely associate them with bedtime. Here, Sun Chlorella Holistic Nutritionist – Nikki Hillis – shares her ‘Sound Asleep, Sun Chlorella Smoothie’ packed with tasty ingredients to help you nod off and enjoy a restful kip.

  • 1 pineapple
  • 1 frozen banana
  • ½ cup uncooked oats
  • 2 cups kale
  • 1 tbsp raw honey
  • 1 tbsp almond butter
  • ½ cup almond milk
  • 1 sachet of Sun Chlorella®
  • Bee pollen to sprinkle on top (optional)
  • Cinnamon

Blend all ingredients in a blender and sprinkle with bee pollen and cinnamon.

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Sun Chlorella: Gorgeous Summer Skin Starts from Within

Glowing, youthful skin
We all want glowing, youthful-looking skin, especially at this time of year. Good skincare isn’t just about what you put on it – looking after your skin from the inside out is also vital for a fresh, healthy complexion. That’s where chlorella comes in. One of the world’s best-kept beauty secrets, it’s a single-cell green algae packed with high levels of nutrients, and can nourish your skin in a number of unique and powerful ways.

Concentrated in chlorella’s nucleic acids is a unique substance called Chlorella Growth Factor (CGF), which is what makes the plant grow so rapidly. CGF – even in small amounts – is known to stimulate tissue repair. The result? Chlorella can help your cells mend and protect themselves, leading to fresh, rejuvenated skin.

Youth-boosting superpowers
Chlorella’s major skin benefit lies in its unusually high levels of nucleic acids, substances that help the body’s cell walls to function efficiently. Chlorella is rich in two forms of nucleic acid called DNA and RNA. Our natural production of these slows as we get older, which can contribute to signs of ageing. Dr Benjamin Franks, a pioneering researcher into nucleic acids, found that a high intake of dietary nucleic acids led to improvement in lines and wrinkles and smoother, more youthful skin. Chlorella is one of the best ways to get nucleic acids into your diet as it’s extremely high in RNA and DNA.

The ultimate cleanser
Chlorella can also help keep your skin clear – that’s down to its high levels of chlorophyll, the green pigment all plants use to absorb energy from sunlight. Research has found taking chlorophyll supplements can help support bowel function. As healthy digestion is vital for clear skin, chlorophyll can have direct benefits for your complexion. Chlorella is the richest known source of chlorophyll in the plant world.

A holistic all-rounder
Chlorella also contains a range of other nutrients, including vitamin D, vitamin B12, iron, folic acid, fibre and essential fatty acids, all known to help promote healthy skin. Its broad spectrum of nutrients makes it ideal for supercharging your overall wellbeing and energy levels – perfect for making the most of summer!

Why Sun Chlorella?

Sun Chlorella® is produced in a special way that ensures your body gets the most from all the nutrients. Chlorella has a very tough cell wall, which stops us from digesting it properly. Sun Chlorella® innovated a special process to solve this problem, using the DYNO®-Mill, a machine that breaks the cell walls so you can digest and absorb it efficiently.

There are different ways to get the benefits of Sun Chlorella®. For the ultimate easy health boost on the move, try Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ Tablets, or add them to smoothies (see recipe, below). You can also apply the goodness of chlorella direct to your skin with Sun Chlorella® Cream, a unique and indulgent moisturiser which harnesses the power of CGF. And you can add Sun Chlorella® ‘A’ Granules to drinks.

Top Recipe – For the ultimate deep cleanse, try this delicious treat:

Sun Chlorella Drink Recipe

  • 300ml water
  • 80g cucumber
  • 80g spinach
  • 40g rocket
  • 40g celery
  • 20g kale
  • 5-15 Sun Chlorella® tablets
  • 20-40g avocado
  • 1 slice of kiwi fruit – optional

Whizz the ingredients together and drink half before breakfast. Store the rest in the fridge and drink before lunch.

For your chance to win almost £150 worth of Sun Chlorella beauty goodies, simply visit us at bodykind.com and answer one simple question.

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The Vital Sunshine Vitamin

Around 10m people throughout England could have seriously depleted vitamin D levels. This is around a fifth of adults and a sixth of children.

Vitamin D is needed by the body, keeping bones and teeth strong whilst supporting a healthy immune system. And it’s after the long winter months that the
body’s reserves are at their lowest.

This much required vitamin is also known as the ‘sunshine vitamin’ as unprotected exposure to sunlight is our main source.

During the winter months (October through April) our bodies are unable to naturally synthesise vitamin D. This is because the sun lies too low in the
sky for us to process it. The only choices you have are to take an expensive trip abroad or to supplement your body – remember, the further you are through
these dark months the more depleted your body will be.

“Due to the lack of sunshine in the UK and the stresses and strains of today’s busy lifestyles it is becoming increasingly difficult to make our own
vitamin D, and winter certainly doesn’t help”, says Andrew Thomas (founder and managing director at BetterYou).

“Many people are suffering the effects of vitamin D deficiency but vitamin D is relatively easy to supplement and the health benefits are clear.”

Cardiff University recently conducted a range of studies which showed that applying vitamin D directly into the mouth, ideally under the tongue or on the
inside of the cheek, means it is absorbed directly through the mucous membrane and into the blood system. Using a liquid spray form achieves this perfectly and is a
fantastic way to supplement vitamin D if you prefer to avoid tablets.

How much vitamin D do you need?

The NHS measures vitamin D in nanomoles per litre (nmol/L). You should aim for levels between 75nmol/L and 150nmol/L, this level is understood to be
optimal for improved health.

View our Vitamin D category at bodykind.com.

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Age-Proof Your Brain: Three key brain nutrients

March 16th sees the beginning of Brain Awareness Week, a global campaign to increase awareness of the benefits of brain research. In the UK, we are living longer. This means that more and more people will be affected by diminished brain function and neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Taking measures to age-proof your brain has never been more important. Read on to discover the 3 most important brain nutrients.

Omega-3

More than half of your brain is made of fat. The most important fat to ‘feed’ your brain is DHA, a type of omega-3 fatty acid. DHA helps to keep the membrane of each brain cell flexible, so that it can function and communicate quickly and efficiently (1).

If your diet is heavy in saturated fats and trans fats from processed foods, on the other hand, then these types of fats will be used in your brain cells, making then rigid and slow to communicate.

Good sources of DHA include low-mercury oily fish such as wild-caught Atlantic salmon, fresh water trout, herring, anchovies and sardines. If you don’t eat these foods regularly then you may benefit from a regular fish oil supplement, or a vegan omega-3 supplement containing DHA.

Antioxidants

Every time a cell makes energy, it produces damaging waste substances called free radicals. These substances have a tendency to bind with other healthy cells, causing damage called oxidation. In this way, our organs and tissues, including the brain, are constantly under attack.

When free radicals attack your brain, they can prevent the brain from producing energy, which in turn causes fatigue, and can even affect memory, mood and coordination (2).

A systematic review published just last year found evidence for the benefit of antioxidant nutrients in the prevention of cognitive decline. The strongest evidence was in support of the antioxidant mineral selenium as well as vitamins C, E and carotenes (3). These antioxidants were found to slow age-related decline in cognition, attention and psychomotor speed (the ability to coordinate fast thinking with doing something quickly, for example in driving a car
or following a conversation).

B Vitamins

There is growing evidence that B Vitamins – in particular folic acid, and vitamins B6 and B12 – play a critical role in protecting the brain from the effects of ageing. B vitamins help to protect the brain by lowering levels of homocysteine, a naturally occurring amino acid that is ‘neurotoxic, and therefore linked to damage in the brain. In studies, levels of homocysteine in the blood have been linked with memory problems and difficulty processing information, as well as age-related cognitive decline and diseases such as Alzheimer’s (4).

A recent randomised controlled trial of 260 elderly people found that a daily B-vitamin supplement reduced levels of homocysteine by 30%, and improved test scores in both cognition and memory (5).

Folic acid and vitamin B6 are present in leafy green, beans, nuts and seeds, while B12 is present in fish, milk, eggs and meat. Unfortunately our
absorption of Vitamin B12 becomes less efficient as we age, and so for some people a supplement may be a sensible measure.

Brain function can in fact start declining as early as age 45, a condition labelled ‘age related cognitive decline.’ (6). By looking after our health and nutrient status in middle age, we can ‘age-proof’ our brain to help ensure a sharp mind and independent lifestyle in later years.

References
  1. Cole GM, Frautschy SA. DHA may prevent age-related dementia. J Nutr. 2010 Apr;140(4):869-74.
  2. Poon HF et al (2004) Free radicals and brain aging. Clin Geriatr Med. 20(2):329-59
  3. Rafnsson SB et al (2013) Antioxidant nutrients and age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review of population-based cohort studies. Eur J Nutr 52(6): 1553-67
  4. Sachdev (2005) Homocysteine and brain atrophy. 29(7):1152-61
  5. de Jager et al (2011) Cognitive and clinical outcomes of homocysteine-lowering B-vitamin treatment in milkd cognitice impairment: a randomised controlled trial. Int J Geriat Psych. 26(6):592-600
  6. Singh-Manous A et al (2012) Timing of onset of cognitive decline: results from Whitehall II prospective cohort study. British Medical Journal. 344:d7622
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Digest this! Sensible rules for better digestion

Good digestion and regular bowel function is something we take for granted, that is until we start to experience problems, digestive related issues account for the largest number of GP appointments in the UK. Women are more likely to visit their doctor about their bowel habits than men who tend to put off seeking advice until symptoms present a problem they can no longer ignore.

An optimally functioning digestive system is essential to good health in order fully absorb the nutrients in food, general poor digestion can lead to uncomfortable symptoms like indigestion, heartburn, bloating and acid reflux, these are usually a result of overeating, poor food choices or rushing or missing meals.

Eating more slowly and most importantly chewing each mouthful of food thoroughly will help improve digestion, decrease bloating and reduce the incidence of heartburn. Try to avoid bending over or lying down straight after eating to help prevent acid reflux.

Our body should produce the majority of the digestive enzymes we require, some foods naturally contain them, but sometimes a little extra help is needed so a useful food supplement for digestive health would be one containing digestive enzymes. These help boost the natural supply of digestive enzymes to improve inefficient digestion following a heavy meal and to reduce symptoms of such as indigestion, flatulence and bloating. In some cases the underlying cause of digestive dysfunction is insufficient production of the enzyme lactase, needed to digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products. A supplement containing lactase enzyme, combined with probiotic bacteria for more effective results, can improve lactose digestion to reduce symptoms in those who are lactose intolerant.

Probiotic bacteria naturally dominate in a healthy gut; they help digest some foods and aid in the absorption of nutrients. The gut flora is intrinsically linked with immunity helping to support normal immune responses and have been shown to be helpful in alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Another useful supplement is aged garlic extract which acts as a prebiotic, enhancing the growth of “friendly bacteria”.

Food intolerances account for some digestive issues, avoidance of problematic foods is often the only way to eliminate symptoms, but dietary changes should be done carefully, do not permanently cut out food groups without professional advice.

Bread and Wheat are foods that Coeliac Disease sufferers should avoid

For general digestive health, nutritionists recommend a diet that includes whole-grains, such as oats and brown rice, fresh fruit and vegetables and high quality protein, such as eggs, organic meat and oily fish, will help promote optimal digestive health.

However some people find high fibre foods difficult to digest so reduce intake of insoluble fibre (such as bran foods) while increasing intake of soluble fibre (found in oats, barley, legumes and vegetables). This also helps prevent constipation and for long term gut health a balance of both fibre types should be consumed. Avoid too many stimulants that over tax the digestive system, drink alcohol and caffeine in moderation and stop smoking.

Chew your food, eat smaller meals, eat a wide variety of foods especially colourful ones to ensure a good supply of nutrients, don’t drink large volumes of liquids with a meal, this dilutes the digestive chyme, the semifluid mass of partly digested food produced in the stomach and increases the chance of air being taken in with each gulp of water. With the festive season coming up there is no reason not to enjoy yourself but these few sensible rules to remember will help you enjoy it.

by Sharon Morey – Quest Vitamins

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Movember: The Male Menopause

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The Movember movement was established to inspire men to be more aware of their health needs, and to seek medical help if needed. Men are less likely to visit a doctor than women. They tend to put off making GP appointments which can mean that symptoms are more advanced and harder to treat. On the internet, television and in popular magazines, there seems to be less information about men’s health than women’s health.

A good example of this is the menopause. While there is a good awareness of the female menopause and its impact on women’s health, there is a lack of awareness of the male menopause, medically known as the andropause. The very notion of ‘male menopause’ is contentious and three quarters of British men have not even heard of it. Despite this, the symptoms of low testosterone are very real.

Andropause is marked by a decrease in testosterone levels that can affect men in middle age, causing symptoms such as low energy levels, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, depression, irritability, increased body fat and loss of muscle mass. On average, from the age of 39, testosterone levels in men decrease by over 1% each year, while competing hormones such as oestradiol and prolactin begin to rise (1).

While andropause is often attributed to the inevitable ageing process, new studies suggest that dietary and lifestyle choices have a much bigger impact (2). Obesity and smoking have significant negative effects on testosterone levels. Stress levels, alcohol consumption, lack of sleep and exercise, nutritional deficiencies and environmental estrogens from plastics are all likely to affect men’s hormonal balance.

There are three key nutrients have been found to increase testosterone levels in clinical studies. The first of these is Vitamin D. Supplementing with this particular vitamin has been found to raise testosterone levels (3). The male reproductive tract is known to have Vitamin D receptors, suggesting that this is a key nutrient in male sexual health.

Magnesium supplementation has also been found to increase testosterone levels in both active and sedentary men after four weeks of supplementation (4). Magnesium is a co-factor in more than 300 biological processes in the body, and so ensuring sufficient intake is critical for anybody interested in achieving optimal health. Magnesium is needed for healthy metabolic pathways, which include hormone production. It also stops testosterone from binding to ‘sex hormone binding globulin’, meaning that it is more active in the body.

Finally, the mineral zinc has profound effects on hormonal health. Even marginal zinc deficiency is known to cause a drop in testosterone levels (4). Zinc is required for the production of testosterone from androstenedione. A deficiency in zinc leads to the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. It also increases the number estrogen receptors and decreases testosterone receptors. The best dietary sources are shellfish, beef and other unprocessed red meats.

Any man experiencing andropause symptoms should visit their GP for a routine check up. Hormone testing can confirm levels of circulating testosterone. The ‘free androgen index’, a measure of active testosterone levels, is a particularly important measure. As a general guideline, the normal range is between 0.7 and 1.0.

References

  1. Feldman HA, Longcope C, Derby CA, et al. Age trends in the level of serum testosterone and other hormones in middle-aged men: longitudinal results from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002;87:589-598.
  2. Endocrine Society. “Declining testosterone levels in men not part of normal aging.” ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120623144944.htm (accessed November 10, 2014).
  3. Pilz S et al (2011) Effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone levels in men. Horm Metab Res Mar;43(3):223-5.
  4. Cinar V et al (2011) Effects of magnesium supplementation on testosterone levels of athletes and sedentary subjects at rest and after exhaustion. Biol Trace Elem Res. Apr;140(1):18-23.
  5. Prasad AS et al (1996) Zinc status and serum testosterone levels of healthy adults. Nutrition 12(5):344-8.
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Probiotics and Children’s Immunity

A recent placebo-controlled trial has found that a combination of probiotics and vitamin C helps to prevent cold infections in young children.

The study, published last month in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, involved 69 preschool children who each received either a placebo supplement or a chewable probiotic and vitamin C supplement for a period of six months. The study was double-blind, meaning that neither the researchers nor the children or their parents knew whether each child was taking the supplement or a placebo.

The results at the end of the six month period were promising. The children who received the probiotic and vitamin C supplement had experienced fewer upper respiratory tract infections (ie common colds), and as a result had fewer absences from preschool and fewer visits to the doctor. The probiotic and vitamin C group were also less likely to have taken antibiotics, painkillers, cough medicines or nasal sprays compared with those children in the placebo group.

Both probiotics and vitamin C are known to modulate the immune system. Vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant, reverses oxidative damage caused by infection. It is also believed to support production of phagocytes, cytokines and lymphcytes – cells that battle infection.
Healthy probiotic bacteria ramp up the body’s production of antibodies and lymphocytes, defending the body against infection (2).

In fact, around 70% of the body’s immune system resides in the digestive system which is home to around 100 trillion (about 3lbs) bacteria.

This particular study used 50mg of vitamin C alongside Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium lactis strains of probiotics. Other strains of probiotics have also been linked with increased resistance to infection, though more research needs to be done in order to determine which particular strain is most effective. Hopefully this study will pave the way for larger trials to be carried out. In the meantime, probiotics have repeatedly been demonstrated as a safe supplement for children, and so trying a probiotic supplement with vitamin C would seem a sensible measure for parents of children who seem to have one cold after another.

Ideally, all children should all eat a diet which is rich in vitamin C and other anti-oxidants, and encourages growth of healthy bacteria. This means eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, and avoiding foods that deplete levels of healthy bacteria such as sugar and white grains. Unfortunately children’s sugar intake is consistently above the maximum recommended amount, and only around 10% of children in the UK manage to eat their ‘5-a-day’ requirement of fruit and vegetables (3).

Especially good sources of prebiotics – foods which feed and therefore boost probiotic bacteria – include leeks, onions, garlic, asparagus and bananas. Natural probiotic yoghurt can also help to support children’s levels of healthy bacteria. Most added sugar comes from breakfast cereals and soft drinks, and so parents should look out for these items in particular, and read labels to check from hidden sugars.

Boosting vitamin C intake and reaching the 5-a-day recommendation means adding fruits and vegetables to meals and snacks – for children, small changes such as adding blueberries to breakfast or pureeing vegetables into pasta sauces are simple changes that can make a huge difference, ensuring that children are happy and healthy both in and out of school.

  1. Garaiova, I. et al (2014) Probiotics and vitamin C for the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool: a randomised controlled pilot study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
  2. Resta SC. Effects of probiotics and commensals on intestinal epithelial physiology: implications for nutrient handling. J Physiol. 2009. 587:4169-4174.
  3. National Diet and Nutrition Survey: results from Years 1 to 4 (combined) of the rolling programme for 2008 and 2009 to 2011 and 2012. Public Health England and Food Standard Agency. 14 May 2014
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Natural Remedies for Women’s Intimate Health

Want natural remedies for women’s intimate health? Try Probiotics.

Us women are great at talking about nearly everything you can think of. However, despite the fact that most women will suffer from thrush, cystitis and / or bacterial vaginosis (BV) during their life time, it appears that intimate health is something we are all apparently too shy to talk about.

The facts are that 75% of women suffer from thrush once in their lifetime, 50% suffer from cystitis at least once and BV affects 1 in 3 women with a high rate of recurrence. Typically these are treated with topical ointments which tend to give just temporary relief, or antibiotics and antifungals which can result in recurrence and can make you feel unwell.

So how and why does having a good balance of friendly bacteria in the intimate area help alleviate and prevent these conditions? Well there is a lot of research behind this.

Thrush is usually caused by the yeast fungus Candida albicans which usually lives harmlessly on the skin and in the mouth, gut and vagina. However, sometimes this yeast becomes overgrown, resulting in thrush. The causes of BV are similar, stemming from a change in balance of bacteria in the vagina as well as a more alkaline pH. And again cystitis is caused by a bacterial infection and interestingly occurs more often in menopausal women due to the lower oestrogen levels.

So in a nutshell, it’s about bacteria! How can probiotics help? The issue with typical treatments are that they do not replenish the healthy bacteria and antibiotics not only knock our good bacteria further out of kilter but also multiple use can lead to antibiotic resistance. Probiotics help replenish our healthy bacteria. But it’s important to note that not all probiotics contain the correct strains of bacteria which are specifically required for these specific intimate issues.

Certain probiotic strains have been trialled and have been shown to increase the efficacy of standard treatments, as well as lowering the risk of recurrence. In particular 2 specific probiotic strains, L. reuteri RC-14® and L. rhamnosus GR-1® are well documented in women’s health, with over 30 years of scientific evidence. OptiBac Probiotics ‘For women’ is a brand new, unique supplement that contains these specific strains and has had significant trialling in itself.

In one trial, participants with thrush took an antifungal capsule with either ‘For women’ daily or placebo for 4 weeks. At follow-up those who had been taking ‘For women’ had 70% fewer symptoms and yeast cell counts than the placebo group.1

In another trial, 252 women who suffered with recurring UTIs took ‘For women’ or antibiotics (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) for one year. After 12 months the number of UTIs had more than halved in both groups, with ‘For women’ being almost as effective as antibiotics. (An impressive result for a natural remedy)2

OptiBac Probiotics ‘For women’ works via several mechanisms: It colonises the vagina, crowds out candida by competing for space and nutrients, fortifies women’s natural defences against Candida , inhibits E. Coli, produces bactericocins which kill pathogens and E. Coli, restores a healthy pH of <4.5, and produces a substance which breaks down the pathogens defensive biofilm.

Taking these strains of bacteria is clearly an impressive start to improving symptoms as well as preventing recurrence. But are there any other natural remedies which can help?

  • When rebalancing our bacteria it’s always a good idea to stay away from sugar and yeast containing foods and drinks which can feed the growth of yeast and bad bacteria, this of course includes alcohol and fruit juices, except low sugar Cranberry which can help in the case of cystitis
  • Drink plenty of water and reduce your coffee
  • Ideally if you have thrush, try to include antifungal foods in your diet such as garlic, coconut oil, ginger and cinnamon among others.
  • Avoid using soaps and douches in the intimate area and swap nylon for cotton underwear and avoid perfumed sanitary products
  • Urinating before and after sex can help with cystitis.
  • The pill can sometimes upset intimate flora – talk to your doctor about alternative contraception

OptiBac Probiotics ‘For Women’ can be taken alongside standard treatments to increase the effect of standard treatments, but is also recommended as a continual method of prevention if a recurrence is an issue. So, if you’re looking to support your intimate health, take a look at OptiBac Probiotics ‘For women’.

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Ease stress levels with Magnesium for restful nights this Sleeptember

September marks the start of a new school year. Typically at this time of year our lives become busier, the holiday period is over and work pressure builds as we head into the colder, darker months in the run up to Christmas.

A recent study by The Sleep Council found that 90% of people admit to suffering from some form of stress in their lives, with almost two out of five saying they are regularly, frequently or constantly stressed.

Not surprisingly three quarters say they have problems sleeping while stressed, with the catch 22 that almost a third say when they can’t sleep they get stressed, while just over a quarter say the best way to relieve stress is to have a good night’s sleep.

It is not always possible to remove stress from our daily lives, but transdermal magnesium can help you to relax and increase the body’s ability to cope with stress.

Magnesium is a natural relaxant, but stress can greatly increase magnesium loss.

This can be a vicious circle, as our body needs magnesium to maintain a state of rest, but a lack of the mineral in our Western diets means many of us do not get the levels we need.

When magnesium levels are low, the nervous system gets out of balance, and we feel increasingly anxious, with our muscles naturally tightening. Magnesium deficiency promotes excessive muscle tension, leading to muscle spasms, tics, restlessness, and twitches. Studies also suggest that magnesium deficiency may also be one of the causes of insomnia.

Andrew Thomas, founder and managing director at BetterYou, said: “The physical effects of stress, including high heart rate and blood pressure, tense muscles and fast and shallow breathing, can play havoc in our bodies. Sleep helps to slow these effects and encourage a state of relaxation.

“Our body needs magnesium to maintain a state of rest, but a lack of the mineral in our low magnesium Western diets means that we are not getting the levels we need. Magnesium levels are difficult to rectify via traditional tablets, as our body benefits most from small regular amounts rather than a large single dose.”

A pilot study by Watkins & Josling (2010) found that magnesium levels increased with BetterYou Magnesium Oil an estimated five times quicker compared with oral supplementation.

Following this, a clinical trial by Cardiff University (2011), highlighted how well magnesium is absorbed through the skin. BetterYou’s range of magnesium products, including oil sprays and flakes, are absorbed faster than capsules and tablets; delivering magnesium directly into the skin tissue and entering cells immediately.

References

Stressember: The worry starts here
Opinion matters surveyed 2035 UK Adults on behalf of The Sleep Council
http://www.sleepcouncil.org.uk/2014/08/stresstember-the-worry-starts-here/

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Your Child’s Health Checklist

It can be difficult getting your kid’s into a back to school mind-set after the summer holidays, so why not prepare them in advance by boosting the mental and physical performance of your little one with a diet packed with vitamins and nutrients and regular exercise over the next 6 weeks.

Follow our checklist to help you give your child a head start of their next school year:

  • Its summer so make sure your little one gets a small dose of vitamin D courtesy of the sun (all fair-skinned people need is a few minutes of sun on their hands, arms and face every day). However, if the sun isn’t shining, then be sure to include it in their diet through fatty fish, like salmon and tuna, and egg yolks.
  • Children need calcium to make strong bones, but they can only deposit this calcium until their early 20s. Make sure yours get their three servings a day – a serve is a 250ml glass of milk, a 200g tub of yoghurt or two slice of cheese (40g).
  • Poor concentration, failing memory, hyperactivity and mood swings can also be an indication of omega 3 (EPA and DHA) deficiency. Our brains need these long-chain omega-3 fatty acids for brain structure and function. Try supplementing your child’s diet with a kid friendly omega 3 supplement.
  • Iodine deficiency is the world’s most prevalent, yet preventable cause of brain damage and lower IQs according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Make sure your child gets between 90mcg and 120mcg a day. Yoghurt, cow’s milk, eggs, mozzarella cheese and strawberries are excellent sources of iodine.
  • Magnesium de¬ficiency has been linked with learning difficulties, hyperactivity and insomnia and it’s believed three quarters of children don’t consume enough of this mineral. A half-cup of cooked frozen spinach provides 75mg. You should aim to include 130mg a day.

More Top Tips

  • Exercise, chill time, and regular, nourishing meals and snacks enhance concentration by banishing energy wobbles.
  • Friendly foods include fresh fish, vegetables, pulses, whole grain carbohydrates, nuts, and seeds. Water helps too!
  • Cerebral zappers include sugar, caffeine, soft drinks, junk food, processed foods, excess salt, meat and dairy, and refined or hydrogenated fats and oils (be sure to read the labels!).
  • We all need sleep to function properly, but while adults need eight hours, children need a minimum of 10 hours shut-eye every night. Encourage regular exercise during the day, and participation in age appropriate extracurricular activities after school which will both result in adequate sleep at night.
  • Make sure your child is protected against colds with a drink of Manuka Honey and fresh lemon juice in hot water. Echinacea will also support the immune system, prevent infections, and minimise the risk of bronchitis and sinusitis.
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